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West Virginia State Flag


Acts of the Legislature
1905

(H. J. R. No. 34.)

JOINT RESOLUTION NO. 16.

[Adopted February 24, 1905.]

Adopting a state flag for the state of West Virginia.

WHEREAS, It is shown by the report of the West Virginia commission to the Louisiana purchase exhibition held at St. Louis during the year 1904, it became and was necessary to adopt a state flag and special ensign to designate the state of West Virginia among the other states of the Union represented at said exposition; and,

WHEREAS, The state of West Virginia to the present time has adopted no state flag or ensign of its individual entity as a sovereign state; and,

WHEREAS, Said commission for the purposes stated in said report did adopt and use a state flag at the West Virginia building on the exposition grounds the design of which said flag is a “sprig of mountain laurel upon an immaculate white field with a pale blue border;” and,

WHEREAS, Said commission did, by said report, recommend the adoption of said design as a state flag; therefore be it

Resolved by the Legislature of West Virginia:

That the legislature of West Virginia hereby adopts a state flag of the following design and proportion, to-wit: Said state flag shall be in length and breadth in the proportion of nine to thirteen, this being the same as the flag of the great American Republic of which West Virginia forms a part; the field thereof shall be pure white, upon the center of which shall be a sprig of the rhododendron maximum or “Big laurel,” having flowers and leaves; and on the reverse side shall be the state coat-of-arms and the motto; the field of pure white shall be bordered by a band or strip of blue, and this in turn shall be bordered by a strip of fringe of carmine red; and said flag shall be regarded and used as the West Virginia state flag on all occasions where a special display of the state’s individuality shall become necessary, or be regarding as appropriate.


Acts of the Legislature
1907

HOUSE JOINT RESOLUTION NO. 2.

(Adopted February 25, 1907.)

Adopting a State flag for the State of West Virginia.

WHEREAS, the legislature did on the twenty-fourth day of February, one thousand nine hundred and five, (see act of one thousand nine hundred and five, pages 520, 521) adopt a joint resolution providing for a state flag with design and proportions;

And, WHEREAS, such a flag has been found to be wholly impracticable for the reason that the lettering on one side reads towards the staff and that the colors on both sides of a white field cannot be used without showing through when opposite each other, thus destroying the distinctive features of the banner and leaving the state without a prescribed official flag;

And WHEREAS, it will be necessary that the state shall have an official flag distinctively it own, among those of other states and nations, at the Jamestown exposition, and as well for many other purposes and occasions hereafter; therefore,

Be it resolved by the Legislature of West Virginia:

That the legislature of West Virginia hereby adopts a state flag of the following design and proportions, to-wit: said state flag shall be in length and breadth in proportion the same as the flag of the great American Republic of which West Virginia forms a part; the field thereof shall be pure white, upon the center of which on the obverse side shall be the great seal or coat of arms of the state, beneath which shall appear the legend “State of West Virginia,” in a scroll; on the reverse side shall appear a sprig or sprigs of the rhododendron maximum, or big laurel, our state flower, having blossoms and leaves; the field of pure white shall be bordered by a band or strip of blue, and this in turn shall be bordered by a strip or fringe of old gold; and said flag shall be regarded and used as the West Virginia state flag on all occasions where a special display of the state’s individuality shall become necessary, or be regarded as appropriate.


Acts of the Legislature of West Virginia, 1929

SENATE JOINT RESOLUTION NO. 18

(Adopted March 7, 1929)

“Adopting a state flag for the state of West Virginia.”

WHEREAS, The legislature of West Virginia, by joint resolution passed on the twenty-fourth day of February, one thousand nine hundred and five, adopted a state flag prescribing the design thereof; and

WHEREAS, The design so adopted is impractical of manufacture, making the cost of purchase thereof prohibitive to the schools of the state and others desiring to purchase said flag; and

WHEREAS, There has been worked out a design embodying all of the features of the first West Virginia state flag so adopted, but so designed as to be practical of manufacture at a reasonable cost to those desiring to purchase the same; and

WHEREAS, It seems desirable to change the design of the West Virginia state flag; therefore, be it

Resolved by the Legislature of West Virginia:

That the legislature of West Virginia hereby adopts a state flag of the following design and proportions to-wit:

The proportions of the flag of the state of West Virginia shall be the same as those of the United States ensign; the field shall be pure white, upon the center of which shall be emblazoned in proper colors, the coat-of-arms of the state of West Virginia, upon which appears the date of the admission of the state into the Union, also with the motto “Montani Semper Liberi” (Mountaineers Always Freeman) above the coat-of-arms of the state of West Virginia there shall be a ribbon lettered, state of West Virginia, and arranged appropriately around the lower part of the coat-of-arms of the state of West Virginia a wreath of rhododendron maximum in proper colors. The field of pure white shall be bordered by a strip of blue on four sides. The flag of the state of West Virginia when used for parade purposes shall be trimmed with gold colored fringe on three sides and when used on ceremonial occasions with the United States ensign, shall be trimmed and mounted in similar fashion to the United States flag as regards fringe cord, tassels and mounting.


State Symbols

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