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West Virginia Highway Markers Database
23 Records Found
Title: Moundsville/Capt. James Herrod County: Marshall

Inscription: Named for Grave Creek Mound. This mound, 900 feet around, 70 feet high, is the largest conical mound in America. The inscribed stone found in it has never been deciphered. Near by was the Indian fort built by Joseph Tomlinson.

Capt. James Harrod assembled 31 men at the mouth of Grave Creek in the spring of 1774 and from this point went to Kentucky. Their settlement at Harrodsburg was halted while they joined Capt. Christian's company in Dunmore's War.

Location: 7th Street, Moundsville, in front of courthouse

Title: "Big Inch" and "Little Big Inch" County: Marshall

Inscription: These War Emergency pipelines, 24" and 20" in diameter, which cross here, were constructed in 1943-44 during World War II. They transported crude oil and refined products from Texas to the oil starved Eastern Seaboard at a time when German U-boats were sinking tankers faster then they could be built. These lines are now owned and operated by Texas Eastern Transmission Corp. for transporting natural gas.

Location: WV 2, south of Moundsville (missing)

Title: Forman Massacre County: Marshall

Inscription: In the "Narrows", September 27, 1777, Captain Wm. Forman (Foreman) and his Hampshire County troops were ambushed by Indians. These men had joined the garrison of Fort Henry in protecting settlements on the Ohio against Indians.

Location: WV 2, McMechen

Title: Marshall County/Wetzel County County: Marshall/Wetzel

Inscription: Formed, 1835, from Ohio and named for Chief Justice John Marshall. In Marshall County is Grave Creek Mound, first among remains left by the unknown race which lived in the Ohio Valley centuries before the white man came.

Formed in 1846 from Tyler. Named for Lewis Wetzel, the great frontiersman who, with his brothers during Indian days, ranged the settlements from their home in Marshall County throughout northern West Virginia.

Location: WV 89 (missing)

Title: Marshall County/Wetzel County County: Marshall/Wetzel

Inscription: Formed, 1835, from Ohio and named for Chief Justice John Marshall. In Marshall County is Grave Creek Mound, first among remains left by the unknown race which lived in the Ohio Valley centuries before the white man came.

Formed in 1846 from Tyler. Named for Lewis Wetzel, the great frontiersman who, with his brothers during Indian days, ranged the settlements from their home in Marshall County throughout northern West Virginia.

Location: US 250 (missing)

Title: Marshall County/Wetzel County County: Marshall/Wetzel

Inscription: Formed in 1835 from Ohio. Named for Chief Justice John Marshall. In Marshall County is Grave Creek Mound, first among remains left by the unknown race which lived in the Ohio Valley centuries before the white men came.

Formed in 1846 from Tyler. Named for Lewis Wetzel, the great frontiersman, who with his brothers during Indian days ranged the settlements from the Wetzel home in Marshall County throughout northern West Virginia.

Location: WV 2, southbound side

Title: West Virginia (Marshall County)/Pennsylvania County: Marshall

Inscription: "The Mountain State"--western part of the Commonwealth of Virginia until June 20, 1863. Settled by the Germans and Scotch-Irish. It became a line of defense between the English and French during the French and Indian War, 1754-1763.

Named for William Penn to whom it was granted in 1681 by Charles II. In 1682, Penn made his first settlement at Philadelphia. Early settlements had been made by the Swedes in 1638. It was one of the thirteen original colonies.

Location: WV 891

Title: Marshall County/Ohio County County: Marshall/Ohio

Inscription: Formed in 1776 from West Augusta. Named for the river which bears an Indian name meaning "Beautiful River." Scene of last battle of the Revolution, 1782. Visited by La Salle, Celoron, Gist, Washington, and later explorers.

Formed in 1835 from Ohio. Named for Chief Justice John Marshall. In Marshall County is Grave Creek Mound, first among remains left by the unknown race which lived in the Ohio Valley centuries before the white men came.

Location: WV 88

Title: Fort Beeler County: Marshall

Inscription: Site of Indian fort built in 1779 on land of George Beeler. In 1782, an attack of Mohawk and Shawnee Indians were repulsed by its defenders, among whom were Martin and Lewis Wetzel, the celebrated scouts and Indian fighters.

Location: US 250 Beeler's Station, across from Beeler's Station Christian Church

Title: Fort Wetzel County: Marshall

Inscription: John Wetzel and sons, Lewis, Jacob, Martin, John, and George, came with the Zanes in 1769 and built a fort. The Wetzels became famous as scouts and Indian fighters. In 1787, the elder Wetzel was killed by Indians at Baker's Station.

Location: US 250 in Limestone, 0.3 miles from junction with WV 88

Title: Marshall County/Ohio County County: Marshall/Ohio

Inscription: Formed in 1776 from West Augusta. Named for the river which bears an Indian name meaning "Beautiful River." Scene of last battle of the Revolution, 1782. Visited by La Salle, Celoron, Gist, Washington, and later explorers.

Formed in 1835 from Ohio. Named for Chief Justice John Marshall. In Marshall County is Grave Creek Mound, first among remains left by the unknown race which lived in the Ohio Valley centuries before the white man came.

Location: WV 2 South

Title: Zachary Taylor/George Rogers Clark County: Marshall

Inscription: General Zachary Taylor, on his way to Washington to be inaugurated as the 12th President of the U. S., found his steamer blocked by ice here. He left his boat and completed his trip over the National Pike. "

In 1772, George Rogers Clark explored the Ohio and Great Kanawha rivers. He stayed the winter here, planted and harvested a crop, and carried out much surveying. Riflemen from the region aided him in winning the Northwest in 1778-1779.

Location: WV 2, 0.4 miles south of junction with County Route 27 (Woodlands/Graysville Road)

Title: West Virginia Penitentiary County: Marshall

Inscription: Established, 1866. A prison for men and women convicted of felonies until prison for women was established at Pence Springs, 1947. Capital criminals were hanged here, 1889-1950. Electric chair used until death penalty was abolished, 1965.

Location: 900 block of Jefferson Avenue, Moundsville

Title: Washington's Land County: Marshall

Inscription: This tract of 587 acres in Round Bottom was patented by George Washington in 1784 after a purchase of warrants held by officers of the French and Indian War. Washington sold these lands in 1798 to Archibald McClean.

Location: Just off WV 2, south of Moundsville

Title: Rosby's Rock County: Marshall

Inscription: At Rosby's Rock (5 Mi. E.), Dec. 24, 1852, the B. & O. Railroad joined Baltimore and Wheeling with the first continuous railroad from the Atlantic to the Ohio, after such engineering feats as building 11 tunnels and 113 bridges.

Location: WV 2, at junction with 12th Street, Moundsville

Title: Baker's Station County: Marshall

Inscription: Site of blockhouse built by Captain John Baker in 1784. Rendezvous of scouts along Indian warpath from Muskingum Valley into Virginia. Near by are buried Captain Baker, John Wetzel, and others killed by Indians in 1787.

Location: WV 2, 0.4 miles south of junction with County Route 27 (Woodlands/Graysville Road)

Title: Grave Creek Mound County: Marshall

Inscription: This world-famous burial mound was built by the Adena people sometime before the Christian Era. The mound was originally 69 feet high, 295 feet in diameter, and was encircled by a moat. There were many mounds in the area - hence the city's name: Moundsville. In 1838, the Grave Creek Mound was tunnelled into and two log tombs with several burials and grave offerings were found.

Location: Jefferson Avenue, at junction with 10th Street, Moundsville

Title: Lindy's Landing County: Marshall

Inscription: The "Spirit of St. Louis," piloted by Charles Lindbergh landed in Moundsville .1 mile west at Langin Field, Aug. 4, 1927. Witnessed by 140,000 locally, he led aviation into the rocket era, creating the U.S. air transportation network.

Location: WV2, Moundsville

Title: Harriet B. Jones County: Marshall

Inscription: Born 3 June 1856, in 1885 was first licensed woman physician in state; opened private practice then hospital in Wheeling, 1892. Jones was active in temperance and women's suffrage; and promoted establishment of state sanitariums in Terra Alta & Denmar, industrial school for girls in Salem and the children's home in Elkins. Elected in 1924 to represent Marshall County in House. Died 28 June 1943.

Location: WV 2, Glen Dale

Title: Washington's Land County: Marshall

Inscription: This tract of 587 acres in Round Bottom was patented by George Washington in 1784 after a purchase of warrants held by officers of the French and Indian War. Washington sold these lands in 1798 to Archibald McClean.

Location: Just off WV 2, south of Moundsville

Title: Benwood Mine Disaster County: Marshall

Inscription: Nearby mine supplied coal to large Wheeling Steel mill. An explosion here, 28 April 1924, resulted in third worst mine disaster in state history. 119 miners, many natives of Poland, Italy and Greece, were killed. There were no survivors. Led to mine safety measures such as rock dusting and self-rescuers.

Location: South Marshall Street, Benwood

Title: Cameron City Pool County: Marshall

Inscription: Constructed with PWA grant, 1939, the unique semi-circular pool with underwater lifeguard station was design of Frank Hunter. Beach area once had sand from Lake Michigan. Pool also emergency reservoir for fire protection. Listed in 1993 on National Register, pool fell into disrepair and closed in 2008. It re-opened in 2013 due to community volunteers and corporate sponsors.

Location: Park Avenue, Cameron

Title: Samuel A. J. Cockayne/The Cockayne Farm County: Marshall

Inscription: Born in 1841, Samuel A.J. Cockayne raised purebred, fine-wooled American Merino sheep in Marshall County. He gained prominence in his field when he won first prize at the 1876 Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia for the quality of wool produced on his farm. In 1879, he helped form the Wool Growers and Sheep Breeders Association in the state, serving as treasurer.

The Cockayne farmhouse was built by Bennett Cockayne around 1850. His son Samuel A.J. was renowned as a sheep breeder. Dubbed Glendale by Samuel's wife Hannah, the farm was the namesake for Glen Dale when it was incorporated in 1924. In 1965, much of the farm was sold to make way for John Marshall High School. The farmhouse is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Location: WV 2, Glen Dale
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