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24 Records Found
Title: West Virginia (Mineral County)/Maryland County: Mineral

Inscription: "The Mountain State"--western part of the Commonwealth of Virginia until June 20, 1863. Settled by the Germans and Scotch-Irish. It became a line of defense between the English and French during the French and Indian War, 1754-1763.

Named for Queen Henrietta Maria, the wife of Charles I, who gave a royal charter to Cecil Calvert, second Lord Baltimore, 1632. First settled at Saint Mary's City in 1634. It is one of the thirteen original colonies.

Location: US 220, at state line (missing)

Title: Grant County/Mineral County County: Grant/Mineral

Inscription: Formed in 1866 from Hardy. Named for General Grant, later President. The Fairfax Stone, which established the limits of Lord Fairfax's lands, marks northwestern boundary. The county has many mountain peaks and beautiful scenery.

Formed from Hampshire in 1866 and named for its great mineral deposits. In Mineral County is Fort Ashby, the only standing unit in the chain of frontier forts which were built in 1755 under George Washington's order.

Location: WV 93, at county line (missing)

Title: Mineral County/Maryland County: Mineral

Inscription: Formed from Hampshire in 1866 and named for its great mineral deposits. In Mineral County is Fort Ashby, the only standing unit in the chain of frontier forts which were built in 1755 under George Washington's order.

Named for Queen Henrietta Maria, the wife of Charles I, who gave a royal charter to Cecil Calvert, second Lord Baltimore, 1632. First settled at Saint Mary's City in 1634. It is one of the thirteen original colonies.

Location: Piedmont, WV 46 (missing)

Title: Mayo and Savage County: Mineral

Inscription: Near here, William Mayo, Thomas Savage, and party spent the winter of 1736 on their expedition for the British King to determine the headwaters of the Potomac River and fix the boundary between Maryland and the lands of Lord Fairfax.

Location: Piedmont, WV 46

Title: Oriskany-Helderberg County: Mineral

Inscription: The massive sandstone in the quarry is the Oriskany and the limestone below it is the Helderberg of the driller and geologist. The "Oriskany Sand", an important gas sand, has produced in excess of a trillion cubic feet of gas in West Virginia.

Location: WV 46, 2 miles east of Keyser (missing)

Title: Dr. John Green County: Mineral

Inscription: One mile south is grave of Dr. John Green, first resident doctor in Mineral County, 1832-73. Born in Bolton, Eng., November 13, 1798; came to Virginia in May, 1827, after serving as medic in Battle of Waterloo. Died Dec. 21, 1873.

Location: CR 4, about 2.5 miles west of junction with WV 42, near Sulphur City

Title: Claysville United Methodist Church County: Mineral

Inscription: Congregation was organized in 1849. The church, constructed in 1850 of lumber produced on a water-powered sawmill and furninshed with seats of chestnut, hand finished, is in an excellent state of preservation. It was first used as a combined church, school, and community building. During the Civil War both Union and Confederate troops held services here, the time depending on who temporarily controlled the valley.

Location: US 50, at junction with WV 93

Title: Oriskany-Helderberg County: Mineral

Inscription: The massive sandstone at the top of the exposure is the Oriskany and the limestone in the quarry is the Helderberg of the driller and the geologist. The "Oriskany Sand", and important gas sand, has produced in excess of a trillion cubic feet of gas in West Virginia.

Location: South of New Creek, US 50 (missing)

Title: Devonian Shale County: Mineral

Inscription: The carbonaceous shale exposed in the picnic area is the Marcellus brown and black shale of the driller. It yields large amounts of natural gas in southern West Virginia.

Location: US 50, near Mineral County line (missing)

Title: Vandiver-Trout-Clause House County: Mineral

Inscription: Located on a 1766 Fairfax grant and site of a former blockhouse. Built by John Vandiver in early 19th century; soon operated as an ordinary. Henry Trout purchased the house in 1869, repairing damage done during the Civil War. In the latter half of the century the house was also a post office and polling place. In 1904 the property was sold to Henry Clause, the inn's last proprietor.

Location: Near Ridgeville, US 50/220 & county route 9

Title: Hampshire County/Mineral County County: Hampshire/Mineral

Inscription: Oldest county. Authorized, 1753, in act effective, May 1, 1754. Formed from Frederick and Augusta. Lord Fairfax, owner, named it for the English shire of the same name. Ice Mountain and Hanging Rocks are among its many natural wonders.

Formed from Hampshire in 1866 and named for its great mineral deposits. In Mineral County is Fort Ashby, the only standing unit in the chain of frontier forts which were built in 1755 under George Washington's order.

Location: WV 28

Title: Fort Sellers County: Mineral

Inscription: On land Washington surveyed for Elias Sellers in 1748 stood this fort, important link in system of frontier defenses. It was garrisoned by an officer and thirty men and withstood several attacks by the Indians.

Location: WV 28, south of Ridgeley, 1.0 mile north of Short Gap, 0.5 miles north of secondary route 28/2

Title: Fort Ashby County: Mineral

Inscription: Fort Ashby, only standing unit in chain of Indian forts that Col. George Washington built along Virginia frontier, 1755. Sharp fighting here, 1756. In 1794, troops under Gen. Daniel Morgan camped here on way to suppress Whisky Rebellion.

Location: Fort Ashby, in front of fort, WV 46

Title: Fort Ashby County: Mineral

Inscription: Erected in 1755 by Lieut. John Bacon under orders from George Washington and garrisoned with twenty-one men. Lieut. Robert Rutherford, with company of Rangers, was defeated here, August 1756, by the French and Indians. Fort was named for Col. John Ashby who arrived there after remarkable escape from the Indians. Ashby commanded the fort until after the Revolutionary War. The W.P.A. restored fort in 1939.

Location: Fort Ashby, WV 28 and WV 46

Title: Hampshire County/Mineral County County: Hampshire/Mineral

Inscription: Oldest county. Authorized, 1753, in act effective, May 1, 1754. Formed from Frederick and Augusta. Lord Fairfax, owner, named it for the English shire of the same name. Ice Mountain and Hanging Rocks are among its many natural wonders.

Formed from Hampshire in 1866 and named for its great mineral deposits. In Mineral County is Fort Ashby, the only standing unit in the chain of frontier forts which were built in 1755 under George Washington's order.

Location: US 50/US 220 (missing)

Title: Averell's Raid/Keyser County: Mineral

Inscription: Here in 1863 General W. W. Averell started the Federal cavalry raid to Salem, Virginia, and then back into this State. This is among the great exploits of the War. Many of his troopers were from West Virginia.

Between 1861-1865, Keyser, then New Creek, was sought by the North and South. It changed hands fourteen times. Fort Fuller, where Potomac State College stands, was supported by a series of forts girding the town.

Location: Keyser, South Mineral Street (US 220 South) and Carskadon Road

Title: Potomac State College County: Mineral

Inscription: Chartered, Feb. 15 1910, as Keyser Preparatory Branch of West Virginia University. Became Potomac State School, 1921; Potomac State School of West Virginia University, 1935; Potomac State (junior) College, West Virginia University, 1953.

Location: Keyser, Potomac State College campus, Mineral (US 220 South) and State streets

Title: Washington's Host County: Mineral

Inscription: At Reese's Mill, ruins of the home of Abraham Johnson, who entertained George Washington and surveying party in 1748. Johnson appeared in Patterson Creek Valley in 1735 and 1740 and in 1750 became an official of the Ohio Company.

Location: WV 46, east of Keyser, 1.5 miles east of county route 9

Title: Mineral County/State of Maryland County: Mineral

Inscription: Formed from Hampshire in 1866 and named for its great mineral deposits. In Mineral County is Fort Ashby, the only standing unit in the chain of frontier forts which were built in 1755 under George Washington's order.

Named for Queen Henrietta Maria, the wife of Charles I, who gave a royal charter to Cecil Calvert, second Lord Baltimore, 1632. First settled at St. Mary's City in 1634. It was one of 13 original colonies.

Location: WV 42

Title: Grant County/Mineral County County: Mineral/Grant

Inscription: Formed from Hampshire in 1866 and named for its great mineral deposits. In Mineral County is Fort Ashby, the only standing unit in the chain of frontier forts which were built in 1755 under George Washington's order.

Formed in 1866 in Hardy. Named for General Grant, later President. The Fairfax Stone, which established the limits of Lord Fairfax's lands, marks northwestern boundary. The county has many mountain peaks and beautiful scenery.

Location: US 50/WV 42 (missing)

Title: West Virginia (Mineral County)/Maryland County: Mineral

Inscription: "The Mountain State"--western part of the Commonwealth of Virginia until June 20, 1863. Settled by the Germans and Scotch-Irish. It became a line of defense between the English and French during the French and Indian War, 1754-1763.

Named for Queen Henrietta Maria, the wife of Charles I, who gave a royal charter to Cecil Calvert, second Lord Baltimore, 1632. First settled at Saint Mary's City in 1634. It is one of the thirteen original colonies.

Location: WV 28 (missing)

Title: Mineral County/Tucker County County: Mineral/Tucker

Inscription: Formed from Hampshire in 1866 and named for its great mineral deposits. In Mineral County is Fort Ashby, the only standing unit in the chain of frontier forts which were built in 1755 under George Washington's order. Formed, 1856, from Randolph. Named for Henry St. George Tucker, eminent jurist and statesman of Virginia. In this county is a part of the vast Monongahela National Forest. Black Water Falls and Canaan Valley are also features.

Location: WV90 (missing)

Title: Don Redman County: Mineral

Inscription: Born in Piedmont on July 29, 1900. Began playing trumpet at age three; learned to play all wind instruments by age twelve. Graduated from Storer College in 1920. First great arranger in jazz; known as "The Little Giant of Jazz." Had profound influence on the development and direction of jazz until his death in 1964.

Location: WV46, Piedmont

Title: Fort Ohio County: Mineral

Inscription: On this site in 1750 the Ohio Company of Virginia erected a fortified storehouse known as Fort Ohio or the New Store. It served as protection and the center of commerce for this area, called Wills Creek until 1755, when Fort Cumberland, across the Potomac River in Maryland, was completed.

Location: WV28, Ridgeley
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