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39 Records Found
Title: Monongalia County/Preston County County: Monongalia/Preston

Inscription: Formed from Monongalia in 1818 and named for James Preston, 13th governor of Virginia. Here is model Federal homestead project, sponsored by Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt, the wife of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, 32nd President.

Formed, 1776, from District of West Augusta. All or parts of 21 other counties, including three in Pennsylvania, were carved from it. Named for the Monongahela River, bearing an Indian name, which means the "River of Caving Banks".

Location: WV 7 (missing)

Title: Henry Clay Furnace County: Monongalia

Inscription: West, in Coopers Rock State Forest, is the Henry Clay cold blast furnace, built 1834-36 by Leonard Lamb. It had capacity of four tons of pig iron per day, and furnished employment for 200 people. Sold to Ellicots in 1837. Operated until 1847.

Location: Coopers Rock State Forest, county route 73, off Exit 15 (Coopers Rock) of I-68

Title: Ice's Ferry County: Monongalia

Inscription: Ice's Ferry was settled by Frederick Ice in 1767. His son, Adam, born the same year, was the first white child born in Monongahela Valley. Andrew Ice in 1785 started the first authorized ferry in western Virginia.

Location: CR73, Cheat Lake

Title: Monongalia County/Preston County County: Monongalia/Preston

Inscription: Formed from Monongalia in 1818 and named for James Preston, 13th governor of Virginia. Here is model Federal homestead project, sponsored by Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt, the wife of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, 32nd President.

Formed, 1776, from District of West Augusta. All or parts of 21 other counties, including three in Pennsylvania, were carved from it. Named for the Monongahela River, bearing an Indian name which means the "River of Caving Banks".

Location: County route 73, 0.2 miles west of Exit 15 (Coopers Rock) of I-68

Title: Salt Sand County: Monongalia

Inscription: The massive pebbly Connoquenessing Sandstone, one of the "Salt Sands" of the driller, forms Coopers Rock. The "Salt Sands" produce oil and natural gas in West Virginia and commercial brines on the Kanawha and Ohio Rivers.

Location: Coopers Rock State Forest overlook parking lot, county route 73, off Exit 15 (Coopers Rock) of I-68

Title: Monongalia County/State of Pennsylvania County: Monongalia

Inscription: Formed, 1776, from District of West Augusta. All or parts of 21 other counties, including three in Pennsylvania, were carved from it. Named for the Monongahela River, bearing an Indian name, which means the "River of Caving Banks".

Named for William Penn to whom it was granted in 1681 by Charles II. In 1682, Penn made his first settlement at Philadelphia. Early settlements had been made by the Swedes in 1638. It was one of the thirteen original colonies.

Location: US 19, at state line (missing)

Title: Monongalia County/Wetzel County County: Monongalia/Wetzel

Inscription: Formed, 1776, from District of West Augusta. All or parts of 21 other counties, including three in Pennsylvania, were carved from it. Named for the Monongahela River, bearing an Indian name, which means the "River of Caving Banks".

Formed in 1846 from Tyler. Named for Lewis Wetzel, the great frontiersman, who with his brothers during Indian days, ranged the settlements from their home in Marshall County throughout northern West Virginia.

Location: WV 7 (missing)

Title: End of Mason-Dixon Survey County: Monongalia

Inscription: Directional Marker: Approach to the High Ridge where this Survey ended, Oct. 18, 1767. The present Pennsylvania-West Virginia Line Stone Marker is dated 1883. The Line was extended to the Southwest corner of Pennsylvania in 1784.

Location: WV 39, at foot of Brown's Hill (missing)

Title: Mason-Dixon Line County: Monongalia

Inscription: Made famous as line between free and slave states before War Between the States. The survey establishing Maryland-Pennsylvania boundary began, 1763; halted by Indian wars, 1767; continued to southwest corner, 1782; marked, 1784.

Location: US 19, at West Virginia/Pennsylvania border (missing)

Title: Mason-Dixon Line County: Monongalia

Inscription: Made famous as line between free and slave states before War Between the States. The survey establishing Maryland-Pennsylvania boundary began, 1763; halted by Indian wars, 1767; continued to southwest corner, 1782; marked, 1784.

Location: US 119, at West Virginia/Pennsylvania border

Title: Statler's Fort County: Monongalia

Inscription: John Statler built a fort here in 1770. In its vicinity a number of settlers were Indian victims in 1777 and 18 white men lost their lives the next year. Later Statler himself and companions were massacred.

Location: WV 7, near Blacksville

Title: West Virginia University County: Monongalia

Inscription: Founded by the Legislature on February 7, 1867, as the Agricultural College of West Virginia under terms of the Federal Land-Grant Act of 1862. On December 4, 1868, the name was changed to West Virginia University.

Location: US 119, at Dorsey's Knob (missing)

Title: West Virginia University County: Monongalia

Inscription: Founded by the Legislature on February 7, 1867, as the Agricultural College of West Virginia under terms of the Federal Land-Grant Act of 1862. On December 4, 1868, the name was changed to West Virginia University.

Location: US 19, Westover (missing)

Title: Willey-Wade-White/Morgantown County: Monongalia

Inscription: A trio of Monongalia County men have made large gifts to the world. Waitman T. Willey led in setting up this State. Alexander L. Wade first demonstrated a system of graded schools. Dr. I. C. White was a leader in field of geology.

Settlement of Thomas Decker, 1758, destroyed by Indians. Settled, 1766-68, by Colonel Zackquill Morgan. Colonel John Evans came in 1769. Incorporated as town, 1785. State College of Agriculture established in 1867 and made into State University in 1868.

Location: Courthouse square, Morgantown (missing)

Title: Marion County/Monongalia County County: Marion/Monongalia

Inscription: Formed, 1842, from Harrison and Monongalia. Named for hero of the Revolution, Gen. Francis Marion. County was home of Francis H. Pierpont, leader in formation of this State. The Monongahela River forms just above Fairmont.

Formed, 1776, from District of West Augusta. All or parts of 21 other counties, including three in Pennsylvania, were carved from it. Named for the Monongahela River, bearing an Indian name, which means the ""River of Caving Banks"".

Location: US 19

Title: Jones' Raid County: Monongalia

Inscription: Over this route through the Monongahela Valley, April 27-29, 1863, General William E. Jones led his division of General John D. Imboden's Confederate army. This raid concluded with the destruction of the oil fields on the Little Kanawha River.

Location: US 19, near Marion County line

Title: Easton Roller Mill County: Monongalia

Inscription: Steam driven grist mill, built ca. 1870 by Henry Koontz, could grind 120 bu. of grain daily. Stone burrs were replaced with iron rollers in 1894, improving output and quality, and representing peak technological development for a local flour mill. Several owners operated mill before changes in marketing and consumer habits, coupled with reduced local grain supply, forced closing in 1930.

Location: US 119, at junction with County Route 119/17, north of Morgantown

Title: Fort Pierpont County: Monongalia

Inscription: John Pierpont, Revolutionary soldier and the son-in-law of Zackquill Morgan, built a fort in 1769. Washington was his guest in 1784. Here was born Francis H. Pierpont, who played an important part in the formation of West Virginia.

Location: County Route 67, at junction with North Pierpont Road and County Route 73/12, north of Morgantown

Title: Fort Martin County: Monongalia

Inscription: Fort Martin was built in 1769 by Colonel Charles Martin. Three settlers were killed and seven captured near the fort in 1779. At the Methodist Episcopal Church here Bishop Francis Asbury preached in 1784.

Location: County Route 53 (Fort Martin Road), 4 miles from junction with WV 100, near Fort Martin

Title: Border Heroine County: Monongalia

Inscription: During the Indian raids in 1779 upon the settlements on Dunkard Creek, savages attacked the cabin of John Bozarth. Armed only with an axe, in a brief hand-to-hand fight, Mrs. Bozarth killed three of the men.

Location: WV7, at junction with CR39, near Core

Title: Catawba War Path County: Monongalia

Inscription: Branch of Warrior Trail of the Great Catawba Indian War Path located here where Mason and Dixon Survey crossed Dunkard Creek for third time. Guide, Six Nations Indians' chief, declared he "would not proceed one step further," because hostile Delaware and Shawnee Indians had ordered them to halt. On Oct. 18, 1767, western end of original Mason-Dixon Line was set on the next high peak, Brown's Hill.

Location: County Route 39, Mason-Dixon Historical Park

Title: Catawba War Path County: Monongalia

Inscription: Warrior Branch of the Great Catawba Indian War Path. Here are located the three crossings of Dunkard Creek by Mason and Dixon. Here the Chief of the Six Nations Indians declared that he "would not proceed one step further." Here hostile Shawnees and Delaware Indians ordered them to stop. The Mason-Dixon survey ended on the next high ridge on Brown's Hill.

Location: County Route 39, east of Mason-Dixon Historical Park

Title: Mason-Dixon Line County: Monongalia

Inscription: Made famous as line between free and slave states before War Between the States. The survey establishing Maryland-Pennsylvania boundary began, 1763; halted by Indian wars, 1767; continued to southwest corner, 1782; marked, 1784.

Location: WV 218, 0.1 miles from junction with WV 7, at West Virginia/Pennsylvania border

Title: Blacksville County: Monongalia

Inscription: Site of Baldwin blockhouse, 1770-1775. Brice and Nathan Worley settled here in 1766. Nathan was killed by Indians in 1777. Laid out as a town in 1829 and lots sold through a lottery. Town is named for David Black, early settler.

Location: WV 7, near junction with WV 218, Blacksville

Title: First Pottery/Old Iron Works County: Monongalia

Inscription: The first pottery in West Virginia was founded here about 1785 and the making of pottery was important before 1800. John Scott, Jacob Foulk, John Thompson, and Francis Billingsley were among the first potters."

Iron furnaces were busy in Monongalia County at early date. At Rock Forge, Samuel Hanway started work, 1798, and on Cheat River, Samuel Jackson built a furnace. The latter plant, under the Ellicotts, worked 1200 men.

Location: Walnut Street, near junction with US 119, Morgantown

Title: 201st Infantry/Field Artillery County: Monongalia

Inscription: This National Guard unit traces its origins to Capt. Morgan Morgan, who formed the company Feb. 17, 1735. It served with Washington's militia in Braddock's 1755 campaign. At the outset of the Revolution he called upon these fighting men to "drive the invaders from our land." One of the oldest and still active military units, the 201st has fought or trained men for every conflict involving the U. S.

Location: Willowdale Road, near junction with WV 705 (Chestnutridge Road), Morgantown

Title: Old Stone House County: Monongalia

Inscription: Oldest stone house in Monongalia County. By legend built by Jacob Nuze on original lot 25. Sold 1795 to tavern-keeper Henry Dering. Owned 1800-1813 by potters John Thompson and Jacob Foulk. Bought by Joseph Shackelford who operated a tanyard here for 50 years. A minister, he led the first Methodist reform movement in area. First Methodist-Protestant Church formed here, 1830. Sold to Frank Cox and George Baker, 1895. Used as dwelling and tailor shop. Occupied by Morgantown Service League, 1935, and restored to near original condition for use as headquarters and shop. House donated to League by Cox heirs, 1976.

Location: Chestnut Street, between house and city garage, Morgantown

Title: Monongalia County/Taylor County County: Monongalia/Taylor

Inscription: Formed, 1776, from District of West Augusta. All or parts of 21 other counties, including three in Pennsylvania, were carved from it. Named for the Monongahela River, bearing an Indian name, which means the "River of Caving Banks".

Formed in 1844 from Marion, Harrison, and Barbour. Named for John Taylor of Virginia. This county was the home of Bailey Brown, the first Union soldier killed in War between the States. He was shot, May 22, 1861, at Fetterman, now Grafton.

Location: US 119

Title: Marion County/Monongalia County County: Marion/Monongalia

Inscription: Formed, 1842, from Harrison and Monongalia. Named for hero of the Revolution, Gen. Francis Marion. County was home of Francis H. Pierpont, leader in formation of this State. The Monongahela River forms just above Fairmont.

Formed, 1776, from District of West Augusta. All or parts of 21 other counties, including three in Pennsylvania, were carved from it. Named for the Monongahela River, bearing an Indian name, which means the "River of Caving Banks".

Location: County Route 73

Title: Dunkard Sands County: Monongalia

Inscription: The Buffalo and Mahoning sandstones, the "Dunkard Sands" of the driller, are exposed in the road cuts and merge to form a great cliff at Raven Rock. They produce oil and natural gas in northern and western West Virginia.

Location: County Route 73, 1.5 miles south of junction with US 119, Uffington

Title: Stewartstown County: Monongalia

Inscription: William Stewart settled here in 1771. Northeast was Fort Dinwiddie. Pioneer minister John Corbley, whose wife and three children were killed in 1782 Indian raid on Garard's Fort, founded Forks of Cheat Baptist Church here in 1775.

Location: US 119, at junction with County Route 65, Stewartstown Road, north of Morgantown

Title: Dents Run Covered Bridge County: Monongalia

Inscription: 1.5 miles south; erected in 1889 by order of Monongalia County Court. Contract awarded to W. A. Loar with Edward W. Brand as superintendent. Stone abutments built by Loar at cost of $198, with wood framework constructed by Wm. and Joseph Mercer at a cost of $250. Bridge is 40 ft. long, 13 ft. wide, and utilizes the Kingpost truss design. Last covered bridge still standing in county.

Location: US 19, at junction with County Route 43, west of Laurel Point

Title: Harmony Grove Church County: Monongalia

Inscription: Built before the Civil War on land donated by Rufus E. and Elizabeth Conn in 1854, this church was the meetinghouse for congregations of Episcopal, Presbyterian, Methodist Episcopal and Methodist Protestant denominations. It was placed on the National Register in 1983.

Location: County Route 45, 2.5 miles from junction with US 19, Harmony Grove

Title: West Virginia University County: Monongalia

Inscription: Founded by the Legislature on February 7, 1867, as the Agricultural College of West Virginia under terms of the Federal Land-Grant Act of 1862. On December 4, 1868, the name was changed to West Virginia University.

Location: US 19/WV 7, at entrance to parking lot of Core Arboretum, northwest of Morgantown

Title: West Virginia (Monongalia County)/State of Pennsylvania County: Monongalia

Inscription: "The Mountain State"--western part of the Commonwealth of Virginia until June 20, 1863. Settled by the Germans and Scotch-Irish. It became a line of defense between the English and French during the French and Indian War, 1754-1763.

Named for William Penn to whom it was granted in 1681 by Charles II. In 1682, Penn made his first settlement at Philadelphia. Early settlements had been made by the Swedes in 1638. It was one of the thirteen original colonies.

Location: US 119

Title: Ice's Ferry County: Monongalia

Inscription: Ice's Ferry was settled by Frederick Ice in 1767. His son, Adam, born the same year, was the first white child born in Monongahela Valley. Andrew Ice in 1785 started the first authorized ferry in western Virginia.

Location: Cheat Lake, county route 73, off Exit 10 (Cheat Lake) of I-68

Title: Border Heroine County: Monongalia

Inscription: Frontier narratives record many hostilities between settlers and Native Americans. One account states Mrs. Bozarth, in a hand-to-hand fight, armed with axe only, killed three men during a 1779 attack on her cabin at the Dunkard Creek settlement.

Location: WV 7, at junction with County Route 39, near Core

Title: Mason-Dixon Line County: Monongalia

Inscription: Made famous as line between free and slave states before War Between the States. The survey establishing Maryland-Pennsylvania boundary began, 1763; halted by Indian wars, 1767; continued to southwest corner, 1782; marked, 1784.

Location: WV 218, near junction with WV 7, Blacksville

Title: Scotts Run/First Shack County: Monongalia

Inscription: By the 1930s 10,000 residents representing 28 nationalities and tied to the coal industry crowded the hillsides, victims of sever poverty brought on by a coal recession and Great Depression. "The Shack" and Scotts Run Settlement House brought needed services and interest of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt in relief programs. North 50 feet was first site for "The Shack", community center set up by Presbyterian mission worker Mary Behner to serve mining families of Scotts Run. Opened in a former stable of Persglove Coal Co., 1932. Site of educational, religious and community service programs, and political, social and labor meetings. Relocated in 1938.

Location: Junction of WV7 and #8 Hollow Road, Pursglove
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