Newspaper Articles


Morgantown Dominion-News
May 6, 1960

Humphrey Proposes Solution to Coal Problems

Mine-Mouth Power Stations ‘Could’ Provide the Answer

Sen. Hubert H. Humphrey here last night proposed the establishment of power stations directly at coal mines as the most logical way to give West Virginia the position it deserves as the power center of the East.

Addressing students and faculty members of West Virginia University, the Minnesota aspirant for the Democratic presidential nomination drew a parallel between the state’s present status in the coal industry and the little boy [who] saw a tree full of apples but had no wagon to cart them home.

“West Virginia is in the center of a national circle of growth,” he said. “And West Virginia should be in the heart of the East – sending out the life blood of the nation’s growth, power. But instead, West Virginia and its vast resources are treated like an unnecessary appendage…”

He proposed as a solution to the state’s coal problems establishment of “mine – mouth” electric power stations.

He said this system represents “an exciting new possibility for the growth of the coal industry and the revitalization of West Virginia’s economy.”

Humphrey admitted that in the past the cost of transmitting electricity over high voltage lines for distances of 200 miles or greater has been more expensive than transporting the coal itself.

“But today,” he said, “growing demand has established the need for huge ‘blocks’ of power at specific centers of consumption.”

The proposed mine –mouth power stations could provide the answer, he asserted.

“It is time for transforming the potential wealth of West Virginia into real prosperity for her citizens,” Humphrey concluded.

Humphrey wound up a day-long tour of northern West Virginia with his address here and flew to Washington Thursday night.


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