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Chapter Six



"I had an overriding desire to help people to upgrade, to benefit our people." - Jennings Randolph


In addition to his activities and accomplishments in the political realm, Senator Jennings Randolph was active outside of the world of politics. He served as trustee to several colleges, was active in various foundations and organizations, and played key roles in several programs dealing with education, youth, the military, and the handicapped.

Before graduating with his bachelorís degree, Randolph became a member of the Board of Trustees of Salem College in 1923 and served on the board for more than 60 years.1 He also became an honorary trustee at Davis and Elkins College due to his long-standing relationship with the college.
Salem College Board of Trustees, 1923

Salem College Board of Trustees, 1923

Salem College Board of Trustees, 1973-1974

Salem College Board of Trustees, 1973-1974

Senator Randolph worked with several benefit foundations, namely the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation and the Napoleon Hill Foundation. The Benedum Foundation, of which Randolph was a trustee, makes charitable donations to "encourage human development in West Virginia and Southeastern Pennsylvania."2 Randolph also served as vice-chairman of the Napoleon Hill Foundation, an institution devoted to educational development.3

Strong in his beliefs toward education, the nationís youth, the military, and the handicapped, Randolph was active in many groups outside of Congress that dealt with these matters. He was an advisor to the National Blinded Veterans Association, the Military Benefits Association, an honorary sponsor of the YMCA National Youth Governors, the National Youth Science Camp, and a member of the Presidentís Committee on the Handicapped.4

Randolph was an active church member, attending the Seventh Day Baptist churches in both Salem and Washington, D.C. In addition to attending these churches, Randolph was a member of several religious organizations, including Religious Heritage of America, where he served as director, and the North American Fellowship of the Baptist World Alliance, where he served as vice-chairman.5 Randolph would remain an active church member until his death in 1998.

Randolph receiving honorary degree

Jennings Randolph receiving honorary degree from West Virginia State University, 1964

Recognized for his wit and achievements, Senator Randolph was awarded honorary degrees by several universities. He received honorary degrees in law from colleges and universities such as Davis and Elkins College, West Virginia University, Oral Roberts University, and several others. In 1940, he received an honorary degree in letters from Southeastern University. Salem College granted him an honorary degree in aeronautical science in 1943 for his work and achievements in the realm of aviation. He was given a second honorary degree in the field of public service from Salem College in 1984.6 Senator Randolph received several other honorary degrees in a variety of fields from many more universities in recognition of his hard work and achievements.
Randolph receiving honorary degree

Jennings Randolph receiving honorary degree from Oral Roberts University, 1972



Citations

1. "Special Memorial Section: U.S. Senator Jennings Randolph, Class of 1924," Tiger Paws, Salem-Teikyo University, Summer 1998-1999, 2.
2. "About Us," Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation, http://benedum.org/about-us/mission/ (accessed May 19, 2018); Jennings Randolph Profile in "Childhood & Youth" Folder, Florian Collection, WVSA.
3. Jennings Randolph Profile in "Childhood & Youth" Folder, Florian Collection, WVSA; "About the Foundation," Napoleon Hill Foundation, www.naphill.org/about/ (accessed May 19, 2018).
4. Jennings Randolph Profile in "Childhood & Youth" Folder, Florian Collection, WVSA
5. Ibid.
6. Ibid.



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Jennings Randolph

West Virginia Archives and History