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Jennings Randolph: Stars in His Eyes

The Jennings Randolph: Stars in His Eyes exhibit was on display in the Archives and History Photo Gallery between July and November 2015.


Photograph, Champion Davis and Elkins College men’s basketball team; assistant coach Jennings Randolph, far left back row; coach Cam Henderson, far right back row, Elkins. 1927. Henderson spent more than thirty-five years coaching football and basketball at Muskingum College, D&E College and Marshall College. Credited with creating basketball’s “two-three zone defense” and “fast break,” he is the namesake of Marshall University’s athletic department headquarters and basketball arena. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph standing behind Franklin D. Roosevelt, late 1930s. Roosevelt was President of the United States from 1933 until his death in April 1945. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with Eleanor Roosevelt, 1930s. She was President Roosevelt’s cousin, wife, mother of six children and namesake of the town of Eleanor in Putnam County. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with Michael L. Benedum on the occasion of the latter’s seventieth birthday, 1939. Benedum, born in Bridgeport, became a very successful gas and oil developer and philanthropist, establishing the Clyde Worthington Benedum Foundation. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph and Albert “Happy”Chandler, senator from Kentucky, autograph baseballs for Clark Griffith, owner of the Washington Senators, 9 April 1943. Chandler went on to serve as commissioner of baseball and a second term as his home state’s governor. Griffith, a long-time player and manager, owned the Washington team from 1920 until 1955. Both men were inducted into the baseball Hall of Fame. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with Loretta Young, 1943. Young’s Hollywood career started in 1917 (when she was four), with her appearances in numerous silent films. She rose in popularity during the 1930s and 1940s, winning the Academy Award for best actress in 1948. From 1953 until 1961 she hosted The Loretta Young Show on NBC television. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, (left to right) Capital Airlines director of public relations Jennings Randolph, Mr. Tichenor, Mr. Dearborn, American Airlines president Ralph S. Damon, BOAC vice-president Gordon Bulloch and Shell Union Oil Company vice-president General James Doolittle, 11 June 1947. Doolittle was a military aviation pioneer who helped develop instrument flying between the World Wars. On 18 April 1942 he led a formation of sixteen B-25 bombers on a raid over the Japanese mainland, for which he received the Congressional Medal of Honor. In 1989 he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the first person to have received both. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with Doris Duke, Arthurdale. Duke was the heiress of the American Tobacco Company fortune and was noted as a socialite, traveler, art collector and philanthropist. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, (left to right) Secretary of the Army Dr. Elvis Stahr, Jr., Elgin Baylor, Jennings Randolph, Oscar Robertson, Jerry West, Rod Hundley, at Coal Field House, 6 February 1961. Baylor, Robertson and West are three of the fifty greatest players in National Basketball Association history. Hundley was one of two West Virginia University players ever to have his number retired, the other being West. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Unidentified man, Governor W. W. Barron, David Brinkley and Jennings Randolph, June 1961. Brinkley was a broadcast newsman for NBC and ABC from 1943 until 1997. He won ten Emmy awards, three Peabody awards and the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with Julia Davis, Robert C. Byrd and W. W. Barron at the West Virginia Society of DC awards, 20 May 1963. Davis, the daughter of Clarksburg lawyer and politician John W. Davis, published more than twenty books, mostly for young adults, mostly historical. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, (left to right) Two unidentified men, Jennings Randolph, Richard Widmark, and another unidentified man, circa 1964. Widmark was an actor featured in more than seventy films between the late 1940s and the early 1990s. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with Ernest Borgnine, at the National Association of Broadcasters preview of network shows, 20 March 1965. Between 1951 and 2012 Borgnine played roles in nearly one hundred-fifty films, including one in 1955 that resulted in his winning the Academy Award for best actor. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, (left to right) Helen Holt, Jennings Randolph, William C. Campbell, and Gertrude Humphreys, West Virginia State Society sons and daughters luncheon, 8 May 1965. Campbell, born in Huntington and educated at Princeton University after World War II, won many amateur golf tournaments during his forty-year career, including fifteen West Virginia Amateur Tournaments and, in 1964, the United States Amateur Tournament. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with Madame Chiang Kai-shek and Senator John Sparkman of Alabama, 23 September 1965. Soong May-ling was the wife of Chinese President Chiang Kai -shek. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with Jacqueline Kennedy and others, Empire State Dinner, January 1968. Kennedy was First Lady of the United States from early 1961 until the death of her husband on 22 November 1963. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with Lyndon Johnson, Edmund Muskie, and others at a Senate reception for the President, 16 January 1969. Johnson, from Texas, was a congressman from 1937 to 1949, a senator from 1949 to 1961, and Vice-President of the United States from 20 January 1961 until 22 November 1963, when he was sworn in as President. After finishing Kennedy’s term he was reelected by a landslide. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with astronaut Michael Collins, 20 May 1970. Collins was Command Module Pilot of Columbia, Apollo 11. Alone, a quarter of a million miles from home, he circled the moon twenty-five times while Armstrong and Aldrin made history on the surface below. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with Harold Russell, 10 July 1970. Russell won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor in 1947 for his performance in The Best Years of Our Lives as Homer Parrish, a seaman who had lost his hands in World War II. Russell lost his making an Army training film in 1944. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with Minnie Pearl at the American Cancer Society convention, Houston, January 1973. Pearl was a popular country comedian on the Grand Ole Opry from 1940 until 1991. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with Mike Trbovich, Arnold Miller and Harry Patrick, United Mine Workers of America, December 1973. These three men were instrumental in establishing Miners for Democracy. In 1972 Trbovich was elected vice-president, Miller president and Patrick secretary-treasurer of the United Mine Workers. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with Jennings Randolph III and Bob Hope, Salem College, 10 May 1974. Hope’s comedic career in films, on stage, and on radio and television lasted nearly eighty years. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with actor Robert Young, 27 February 1975. Young had roles in more than one hundred films from 1931 until 1952. Starting in 1949 through 1954 on radio and for six more years on television he was the father on Father Knows Best. His last television series was Marcus Welby, M.D. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with Gerald Ford; Pamela Jo Baker of Wellsburg, Easter Seals poster child; Peter Falk and Robert Byrd, 13 March 1975. Ford was thirty-eighth President of the United States. Falk portrayed the title character in the NBC television series Columbo. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with Judge Robert Maxwell, James McCartney, Donald Whitehead, General Chuck Yeager, Paul Jenkins, Paul Garber, G. J. “Jack” King, General E. R. Quesada, 20 June 1975. Yeager, born in Myra, Lincoln County, was the first pilot to exceed Mach 1 in level flight on 14 October 1947. Garber, who had worked at the Smithsonian Institution since 1920, became the first curator of its National Air Museum in 1946 and the first curator of the National Air and Space Museum when it opened in 1976. He is the namesake of the Paul E. Garber Preservation, Restoration and Storage Facility at Dulles Airport. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with Iron Eyes Cody, 5 December 1975. For sixty years Cody portrayed Native American characters in numerous film and television productions. He was of Italian descent. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with Billy Kilmer, Washington Redskins, 24 February 1976. Kilmer spent the last eight seasons of an eighteen year NFL career as quarterback of the Washington Redskins. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with Nanette Fabray, 30 April 1976. Fabray was a star of stage, screen and television from the late 1930s through the end of the century. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with Hank Aaron, 19 May 1976. Aaron broke Babe Ruth’s home run record in 1973. He still holds the major league records for runs batted in, extra-base hits and total bases. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1982 and awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2002. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with Archie Talley and Nick Rahall, 21 May 1976. At Salem College in 1975-1976 (before three-point goals) Talley averaged 41.1 points per game. Playing professionally in Germany in 1978 he scored 116 points for his TV Clausen team in their 132-91 victory over the Tria team. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with Queen Elizabeth II, 8 July 1976. She is Queen of the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Pakistan, Ceylon, Jamaica, Barbados, the Bahamas, Grenada, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Belize, Antigua and Barbuda, and Saint Kitts and Nevis. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, (front row, left) Joe DiMaggio, (front, center) Jennings Randolph, remaining individuals are Energy Research and Development Administration, union and coal company officials, 8 August 1977. DiMaggio, known as “Joltin’ Joe”, played thirteen seasons with the New York Yankees between 1939 and 1951 and was on the All-Star team thirteen times. His hitting-streak record (56 consecutive games, in 1941) still stands. He entered the Hall of Fame in 1955. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with New Dealer Thomas Corcoran and Robert Vaughn who played the title role in "FDR" at the National Theatre, Washington, November 1977. Vaughn has appeared in many films and television productions since the mid-1950s. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, (left to right) An interpreter , Chinese paramount leader Deng Xiaoping, Jennings Randolph and Senator Frank Church, 30 January 1979. Deng was born in Sichuan Province in 1904 and was educated in China, France and the Soviet Union. He joined the Chinese Communist Party in the early twenties and gradually rose in power, surviving the Long March (1934-35), the second Sino-Japanese War and the civil war with the Nationalists. He fell out of favor during the Cultural Revolution and re-established his status after the death of Mao 1n 1976. He retired in 1992 and died in 1997. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph shows Pearl White Ward of Parkersburg his 1978 Wright Brothers Memorial Trophy, 20 March 1979. Ward purportedly was the first woman to make a parachute jump over the United States in Alexandria, Virginia in 1928. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with Armand Hammer at the Campobello Armand Hammer Conference, Peace and Human Rights, Campobello Island, Canada, 25 August 1979. Hammer was a businessman with many connections in the Soviet Union beginning in the 1920s trading furs, foodstuffs, pharmaceuticals and pens and pencils, which he manufactured. Later he controlled and operated Occidental Petroleum from 1957 until his death in 1990. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, (left to right) Susy Young, John Young, Jennings Randolph, Bob Crippen and Ginny Crippen. 1 June, 1981. Young was mission commander and Crippen was pilot of Columbia, STS-1, the first Space Shuttle flight, April 12-14, 1981. Randolph was the only senator to witness their launch from Kennedy Space Center and their landing at Edwards Air Force Base. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, (left to right) Unidentified man, Jennings Randolph and John Glenn, recipient of an honorary degree at West Liberty State College, 16 May 1981. Glenn was the first American to orbit the earth on 20 February 1962. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with Sam Snead, Salem Pro-Am Tournament, Bridgeport Country Club, 20 September 1981. Snead was a golfer long associated with the Greenbrier. During his career he won eighty-two PGA tournaments (including seven majors) and one LPGA tournament, the Royal Poinciana Invitational in 1962. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with Chuck Hagel, deputy administrator of the Veterans Administration, 28 September 1981. Hagel, a decorated Vietnam War veteran, served as United States Senator from Nebraska from 1997 to 2009 and as President Obama’s Secretary of Defense from February 2013 until November 2014. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, (left to right) Anne Wagner, Bonnie Wasserman, Jennings Randolph and Amy Carter, 16 June 1982. Carter is the daughter of President Jimmy Carter and his wife Rosalynn. She lived in the White House from 1977 until 1981. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with Edward Kennedy, Arnold Palmer and Tip O'Neill, Congressional Walk America, March of Dimes, 12 April 1983. Palmer is the first professional golfer to be awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with Danny Thomas and Nick Rahall, 1983. Thomas started his performing career on radio in the 1940s, moving on to motion pictures and television. For thirteen years (1953-1965) he played the title role in Make Room For Daddy. He and Rose Marie, his wife of fifty-five years, were the founders of Saint Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with Victoria Principal and Orrin Hatch, Arthritis Foundation, 31 January 1984. Principal was in several films starting in 1972 and many television productions for the rest of the century, most notably the part of Pamela Barnes Ewing on the CBS soap opera Dallas from 1978 to 1987. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with German Chancellor Helmut Kohl, 6 March 1984. Kohl was elected in 1982 and served as Chancellor of West Germany, during which time he was the driving force of reunification, until 1990. He was then Chancellor of Germany from 1990 to 1998. Also, he worked with French president Francois Mitterrand to create the European Union. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph, an unidentified man, national poster child Helen Humphrey, and Mickey Mantle, March Of Dimes Walk-a-Thon, 3 April 1984. For eighteen seasons Mantle played center field (the last two at first base) for the New York Yankees. He hit his stride in the mid-to-late fifties with a series of outstanding seasons using his power and switch-hitting capability and strong defensive play. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1974 and died in 1995. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, An unidentified woman, Jennings Randolph and Prince Philip Mountbatten, Duke of Edinburgh, 21 May 1984. Lieutenant Mountbatten married Princess Elizabeth in 1947; when she ascended to the throne in 1952, he resigned with the rank of Commander. In 1957 the Queen made him a Prince. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph, Mary Lou Retton, Ed Etzel and Robert C. Byrd, 17 August 1984. Retton, a native of Fairmont, competing in gymnastics, brought home the women’s all-around gold medal, two silver medals (team and vault) and two bronze medals (uneven bars and floor exercise) from the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles. Etzel, faculty member at West Virginia University, won the gold medal in the fifty meter prone rifle shooting event at the same Olympics. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with Ted Turner, Napoleon Hill Gold Medal Award Dinner, 1985. Turner is a media mogul known for creating superstation WTBS and Cable News Network, he is a former owner of the Atlanta Braves. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with Admiral Arleigh Burke and Frank Carlson, Silver Quill Awards dinner. Burke’s headstone at the United States Naval Academy Cemetery in Annapolis is carved with a one-word epitaph, “Sailor”. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives
Photograph, Jennings Randolph with Lady Bird Johnson, 1960s. Johnson was First Lady of the United States from 1963 until 1969. She was given the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1977 and the Congressional Gold Medal in 1988, mostly for her efforts to beautify the environment. Jennings Randolph Collection, West Virginia State Archives


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West Virginia Archives and History