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HULING HENRY LEWIS


A generation ago, the ministry and the teaching profession claimed a large majority of those colored young men whose ambition and intelligence drove them away from the farm or from day labor. With the rising tide of intelligence and better equipment, came a widening of those professions which the colored man might enter with profit. Among these was dentistry. It is gratifying to observe and to note the success of those young men of the profession who have taken time to equip themselves at the best schools. Such a man is Dr. Huling Henry Lewis, of Charleston. Another interesting thing about Dr. Lewis is the fact that he did not find it necessary to leave home in order to succeed.

He was born at Charleston on January 7, 1895, so it will be seen he entered upon his practice young. His father, Cary Lewis, better known as Lewis Strother, is the son of Cain Lewis. His mother, who, before her marriage, was Mary Dandridge. Dr. Lewis laid the foundation of his education in the public schools of Charleston, from which he passed to West Virginia C. I. at Institute for his literary work, finishing them in 1916. From there he went to the Howard University School of Dentistry, where he won his D.D.S. in 1920. He made his own way in College by means of hotel work and the ammunition plant during the war.

Following the completion of his course he returned to Charleston and maintains attractive dental parlors and operating rooms on Court Street. Already he is firmly established in the practice. Dr. Lewis is a Republican in politics, in religion a Baptist. He belongs to the Masons and the Elks and State and National Medical and Dental organizations. He belongs to the Chi Delta Mu, Greek letter fraternity and is an accomplished musician. Dr. Lewis is one of the three dentists who give their services to the public school free dental clinic.


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