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WILLIAM E. MCCOLLUM


Few other States in proportion to population have sent out more successful men in the various professions of both races than has North Carolina. They are a sturdy lot, accustomed to hard work and simple living at home and usually succeed.

One of these North Carolinians who has done good work in West Virginia, where he has reflected credit on his native State, is Dr. William Ester McCollum of Montgomery. Dr. McCollum was born in Rockingham County and reared on the farm where he remained till he was twenty. He was born on January 20, 1884. His father, Isaac McCollum, a farmer, is the son of Ned and Mary McCollum. The mother of our subject, before her marriage, was Martha Lomax, daughter of Charlotte Lomax.

Growing up on the far, young McCollum laid the foundation of his education in the public schools. His mother was ambitious for him and a cousin, Rev. R. W. Winchester, was also a source of helpful inspiration. When he made up his mind to go to college, he was under the necessity of making his own way. He entered Bennett College at Greensboro for his literary course, where he studied for five years. He earned his expenses in the West Virginia coal fields. When ready for his dental course, he matriculated at Meharry Dental College, Nashville, where he won his D.D.S. degree in 1913. After the first year at Meharry he spent his vacations at hotel work, which he found more attractive than coal mining. On completing his course, he began practice at Williamson, where he remained for two years. At the end of that time he moved to Montgomery, where he has since resided and where he built up a splendid practice.

On October 3, 1919, Dr. McCollum married Miss Henrietta James a native of Christiansburg. She was educated at Christiansburg Institute and Morristown, Tenn., and is an accomplished teacher.

Dr. McCollum is a member of the Methodist church of which he is a trustee. He belongs to the Masons and is a member of the West Virginia Medical and Dental Society. In politics he is independent locally, a Republican nationally. He is of the opinion that the things which will contribute most to the progress and development of the race are industrial education and economic development.


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