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Timeline of West Virginia: Civil War and Statehood
June 17, 1861


Staunton Spectator
July 2, 1861

The Feeling in Kanawha.

On Monday, the 17th of June, the County Court o Kanawha appropriated $15,000, for the defense of the State, and on the same day a public meeting was held in which the following resolutions were adopted:

1st. Resolved. That as the county of Kanawha gave a large majority in the recent election against the Ordinance adopted by the Convention of Virginia, separating the State from the late U. Stats, it is due to the people of the County to publish to the world the position they now occupy, and which is, that recognizing the great principle which pervades the Declaration of Independence, framed by the immortal Jefferson, and which i the basis of Republican Government, we cheerfully submit to the will of the majority, pronounced with unparalleled unanimity by the State at large, ratifying that Ordinance.

We further proclaim to the world that although we differed in opinion upon the adoption of that Ordinance, we are now united to a man and firmly resolved to stand by Virginia one and entire, and to defend her soil against all invasion of United States troops, whatever may be the pretext with which such invasion may be made.

2. Resolved, That the Richmond, Charleston, Point Pleasant and Cincinnati papers be requested to copy the above

JOHN D. LEWIS, Ch'm
W. A. McMullen, Sec'


Richmond Enquirer
June 25, 1861

[From the Kanawha Valley Star, June 18]

Public Meeting in Kanawha County.

Monday an excitement unusual even in these sensation times, pervaded the people of Kanawha, who assembled at Charleston. The last papers from Cincinnati contained the gratifying news that sometime this week this Valley would be invaded by some six or seven thousand hired cut-throats. How did Kanawha county receive this intelligence? What did she do towards preparing for the welcoming of these friends of the Stars and Stripes? The County Court in the morning appropriated $15,000 in defense of the sacred soil of the old Commonwealth; many large private contributions have been made to the same fund. It may not be proper to mention how many of our citizens have volunteered. In the afternoon a public meeting of the people was called in the Court House.

Mr. James H. Brown, the Union delegate to the Legislature, addressed the assembly explaining his position; that his past views were well known; that he had been emphatically a Union man; that now he acknowledged himself a submissionist before the awful majesty of the people of Virginia; that he was opposed to any division of the old State; that he condemned and reprobated the assembling of the Wheeling Convention at this time; that if their counsels were listened to a double war would rage throughout Western Virginia; that he hoped every man in Kanawha was ready to die for the honor and safety of his home; that when the hour of trial came he himself would be found in the ranks disputing every inch of ground with the ruthless invader. Dr. Patrick, being then called for, declared that it was the duty of every man in Kanawha to resist to his uttermost the invasion of the soil of Virginia. After which the following resolutions were proposed by Mr. J. Madison Laidley, and unanimously adopted by the meeting:

1st Resolved, that as the County of Kanawha gave a large majority in the recent election against the Ordinance adopted by the Convention of Virginia, separating the State from the late U. States, it is due to the people of the County to publish to the world the position they now occupy, and which is, that recognizing the great principle which pervades the Declaration of Independence, framed by the immortal Jefferson, and which is the basis of Republican government, we cheerfully submit to the will of the majority, pronounced with unparalleled unanimity by the State at large, ratifying the Ordinance.

We further proclaim to the world that although we differed in opinion upon the adoption of that Ordinance, we are now united to a man, and firmly resolved to stand by Virginia one and entire, and to defend her soil against all invasion of United States troops, whatever may be the pretext with which such invasion may be made.

2d Resolved, That the Richmond, Charleston, Point Pleasant and Cincinnati papers be requested to copy the above.

JOHN D. LEWIS, Chm.
W.A. McMULLER, Secy.


Timeline of West Virginia: Civil War and Statehood: June 1861

West Virginia Archives and History