Skip
Navigation

Timeline of West Virginia: Civil War and Statehood
July 10, 1862


The Rebellion Record: A Diary of American Events, with Documents, Narratives, Illustrative Incidents, Poetry Etc.
Frank Moore, ed. New York: G. P. Putnam, 1862.

July 10 A meeting was held in Huttonville, Randolph County, Va., at which the following resolution was adopted:

Resolved, That we, as citizens, are willing to live under the Federal Government and its laws, and that we will give any information to the Federal commanders in relation to the operation of certain bands of men known as Guerrillas or Mountain Rangers.


Wheeling Intelligencer
July 24, 1862

Meeting of Citizens of Huttonsville.

Huttonsville, Randolph Co., Va.,
July 10th, 1862.

At a meeting held by the citizens of Huttonsville and vicinity, in accordance to an order issued by Col. Harris, of the 10th Virginia regiment volunteers, upon motion of Melvin Currence, Jesse F. Pharis as called to the chair as President, and Alfred Hutton appointed Secretary.

Thomas B. Scott, Melvin Currence, John A. Hutton, Henry Currence, A. M. Wamsley and Andrew C. Currence were appointed to draft resolutions. The following resolution were presented for the approval of the meeting:

Resolved, That we, as citizens, are willing to live under the Federal Government and its laws, and that we will give any information to the Federal army, or any of its commanders, that may be within our knowledge in regard to those marauding bands of men.

Resolved, That we, as citizens, not being arms in any warfare, desire to hold a neutral position in this great national strife.

Resolved, That J. Franklin Pharis, President, is appointed by this meeting to convey these resolutions to Col. Harris, of the 10th Virginia regiment.

On motion of Jesse F. Pharis, the following resolution was offered and adopted, and was signed by twenty gentlemen of the meeting:

Resolved, That we, as citizens of Huttonsville and vicinity, bind ourselves, our lives, our fortunes and our honors, that we will oppose any band of men known as Guerrillas, or Mountain Rangers, and that we will not give any aid, comfort or information to any such bands of men, and that we will give all the aid and information in our power to any of the United States forces nearest at hand, against such bands of men.

The foregoing resolutions are too washy for the times. The idea of men coming together to record the fact that they are willing to live under the Government of the United States, as if there was something meritorious in it, provokes the jeer of a truly patriotic man. They might just as well, and even in better taste, have said that they were willing to live under the secession government. If the loyal people of Huttonsville cannot do better than this, then there is not much propriety in sending soldiers to protect them. Why do they not come out like men, and declare earnestly, unconditionally and patriotically, who they are for. If they are for the Government, why do they not pledge their lives and property to defend it; and not only pledge, but act; shoulder their guns and help put down the guerrillas.

The last resolution, offered by J. F. Pharis, has more of the true ring in it but is far enough below the proper mark.


Timeline of West Virginia: Civil War and Statehood: July 1862

West Virginia Archives and History