Skip
Navigation

Timeline of West Virginia: Civil War and Statehood
September 12, 1862


The Wheeling Daily Intelligencer
September 18, 1862

War Meeting in Parkersburg.

[From the West Virginian.]

One of the largest and most enthusiastic meetings ever called together in this place, came off on last Friday evening at 7 o’clock, in front of the Court house. By a unanimous vote Hon. J. B. Blair was called to the Chair, and J. E. Wharton, Esq., made Secretary. The meeting having been called to order, P. J. Van Winkle, Esq., came forward and delivered an eloquent address, telling the citizens that the time for buncomb [sic] speeches had passed, and now was the time for action. He spoke for about half an hour, when Col. Mulligan being loudly called for, proceeded to the speaker’s stand, and being introduced to the meeting by Mr. Van Winkle, delivered one of the most stirring speeches that it has ever been our lot to listen to. It is impossible for us to do justice to the speaker by attempting to give even a synopsis of his remarks. He called upon the Irish patriots to come to the support of the Government—that Government which had protected them from tyranny and despotism. Did they wish to see Ireland, their native land, freed from the British yoke, and their people made happy? If so, give America your aid in crushing out this wicked rebellion, and ere the dawn of many days, Ireland, their once happy home, will be recorded as one among the happiest nations of the earth. But allow this aristocratic southern confederacy to triumph, and your doom is cast.

Such is the substance of his remarks, during which he was frequently interrupted by cheers and applause from the audience. Many an Irishman in that assemblage who “owed his allegiance to the Southern Confederacy,” has, since the delivery of that address, sworn to aid in the restoration of our Government. Had we known that a speech of so much eloquence would have been delivered by Col. Mulligan, we would have made a report of it verbatim at the time of delivery.

He was followed by Judge Boreman in a few able but brief remarks on the subject of enlistments. After which the meeting closed, amid deafening cheers for the Union and groans for Jeff. Davis.


Timeline of West Virginia: Civil War and Statehood: September 1862

West Virginia Archives and History