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Timeline of West Virginia: Civil War and Statehood
June 10, 1863


Wheeling Intelligencer
June 16, 1863

The Tenth – Presentation of a Sword &c., to Surgeon Blair.

Camp 10th Reg’t Va. Vol. Inf.
Beverly, June 10th.

Editors Intelligencer:

After a great many turns and twists the 10th Reg’t Va. Vol. Inf., as I predicted in my last from Winchester, has again found its way to West Virginia, where it, of rights, belongs. I have not much to lay before your readers this time, except an interesting little incident that took place this afternoon. It has long been the wish of the non-commissioned officers and privates of this regiment to present our Assistant Surgeon, J. R. Blair, with something or other as “souvenir.” So on last pay-day they began raising a collection for that purpose. After raising quite a nice sum they sent to A. M. Adams & Co., of your city, and purchased a very find medal, officers sword, sash and belt. The regiment was on drill this afternoon when our Colonel being informed of the wishes of the boys had them to form a hollow square, with the doctor and some few others on the inside. The Colonel stated what he understood to be the intention of the boys; after which Serg’t Powers of Co. C, made the presentation, with the following terse and appropriate remarks:

Dr. Blair: I present you, on behalf of the non-commissioned officers and privates of the 10th regiment, this sword, sash and belt, as an expression of the high esteem and enduring regard they entertain towards you for the zeal you have manifested in our welfare. The sacrifices you have made in studying our comfort instead of you own, has been duly appreciated by the recipients, and they are sorry that they are unable to make a substantial demonstration of the gratitude they feel; but of one thing you can always rest assured – the esteem of the boys of the 10th.

On receiving the present the Doctor said:

Sergeant And Fellow Citizens – To be singled out by the men of the10th Virginia Regiment , and made the recipient of such a substantial favor, as has this day been so gracefully bestowed upon me, cannot but fill my bosom with emotions of pride. It makes me doubly proud to think that this esteem was unsought by me – that it is the voluntary act of those whose bedsides I have stood by when death was staring them in the face. It has been my study – and ever shall be while I have the honor or remaining with you – to do all in my power to relieve the sufferings of those whom I am entrusted with. I came into the army not for the emoluments, but because I felt it to be my duty, to my country and humanity. I cam among you a stranger, but now if I would enumerate my friends I would have to call on my friend the Adjutant for the morning report of the Regiment. By this I mean that towards every man of the Regiment I feel that I am linked by a bond of fellowship, in danger and in success, that make us all one. With the 10th, and her honor and fame, we are all bound to rise or fall. But who that knows the men of the 10th, as I do, can talk about failure. They have staked everything upon the cast, home! life! all!! all!!! there is no flinching for them. They have just helped to make a New State; and they must, they will be the men and soldiers to support this – the first born child of freedom. In conclusion, fellow soldiers, permit me to say that whatever may be our fortunes, wherever we may go, whatever we may be permitted to do, I shall ever cherish this memorial of the partiality and good will of the 10th Regiment as a most satisfactory token of your estimation of my efforts to discharge my duty, in my sphere, in my country’s service, and of the friendship of men of whose friendship a man even more ambitious than myself might well feel proud.

The whole ended with three rousing cheers for the Doctor. Nothing of any importance to write of just now, but you may rest asy with the assurance that if anything strange happens out here that you will hear from

The Tenth.


Timeline of West Virginia: Civil War and Statehood: June 1863

West Virginia Archives and History