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Timeline of West Virginia: Civil War and Statehood
November 14, 1863


Official Records
Series 1, Volume 29, Part 1
641

NOVEMBER 14-18, 1863. – Scout from Martinsburg, W. Va.

Report of Col. Robert S. Rodgers, Second Maryland (Eastern Shore) Infantry.

MARTINSBURG, W.VA., November 18, 1863.

CAPTAIN: Lieutenant Wyckoff left on a scout on the 14th, and has just returned. Went to Pughtown, thence up to the head of Cedar Creek, at Van Buren Furnace. At the cove about 4 miles above he saw picket fires, which indicated some force of the enemy. Having only 30 men he did not think it prudent to attack them, and returned nearly the same way, but on opposite side of the valley.

Near Van Buren Furnace, he captured 3 prisoners and 4 horses of the Twelfth Virginia Cavalry. One of them escaped on foot from the guard at night. One of these prisoners is believed to be an officer, but denies it. One other soldier belonging to Captain Pierce’s company was also taken; and 1 citizen arrested named Richards, at a point 10 miles this side of Van Buren, being charged with taking horses from United State teams about a year ago, which he confesses doing, but says he was drunk. His neighbors offer to come in and pay the damages and go his security.

Lieutenant Wyckoff reports that he got on the track of 10 men, who had been to Hampshire County after horses. They had 12. They were dressed in our uniforms. Many stragglers are said to be in the mountains from the rebel army, and Lieutenant Wyckoff saw a number who escaped in the mountains. They are either single or in very small parties. He got 6 of them here. He thinks this neighborhood now is a rendezvous for horse-thieves, who operate chiefly in Hampshire County.

I have, in obedience to your instructions, ordered Lieutenant Wyckoff to report to his regimental commander.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant.

R. S. RODGERS,
Colonel, Commanding.

Capt. WILLIAM M. BOONE, A. A. G.


Timeline of West Virginia: Civil War and Statehood: November 1863

West Virginia Archives and History