Timeline of West Virginia: Civil War and Statehood
January 1863

Richmond Daily Dispatch
January 22, 1863

A Yankee raid into Southwestern Virginia.

[Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.]

Princeton, Va., Jan.14, 1863.

Last week 112 Yankee cavalry attempted a raid which, in point of audacity, equalled that on Bristol, and came near being as successful. Their aim was to destroy the bridge across New river, about six miles east of Dublla Depot. They came by way of Sewell Mountain, Mendow Bluff, Blue Sulphur, Alderson's Ferry, through Monroe county, to the line of Giles county, on Peters Mountain, nineteen miles from the bridge. At this point they were accidentally met by four or five soldiers, who fired upon them, when they turned back and effected their escape by way of Red Sulphur and Rollins's Ferry. It is believed they were informed by their scouts about the time they reached Peters's Mountain that there was a force at the bridge, or they would not have turned back. Some 600 soldiers, returning from Bristol the day before, had been stationed there. As the scamps passed through Centreville they cheered lustily for Jeff. Davis, and were mistaken by many of the citizens for Confederate cavalry. They passed between the troops at the Salt Sulphur and Narrows going and returning. Col. Wharton attempted to intercept them, but was about one hour too late, he having no cavalry. They seemed to be in no particular hurry, but took it quite leisurely, stopping to eat and sleep as they saw fit. Is it not remarkable that, with all the force we have in this section, these marauders should not have encountered a single picket or been halted at all? The fact was, the route pursued by them was open to the bridge. Another party of 250 cavalry kept on in the direction of Lewisburg, burning Austin Handley's elegant mansion, near town, Col. Samuel McClung's barn, and firing Bugger's fine manufacturing mill. They belted on reaching the top of the hill overlooking Lewisburg, and, discovering our troops there, beat a hasty retreat. Their intention was to burn the place, at least they so declared. These troops were from Malden, in the Kanawha Valley, and, if I am not deceived, this demonstration is but a prelude to something of the "same sort," but of a more imposing character, not far off.

Timeline of West Virginia: Civil War and Statehood: Undated: January 1863

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