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35 Records Found
Title: Greenbrier County/Monroe County County: Greenbrier/Monroe

Inscription: Formed, 1778, from Botetourt and Montgomery. Named for the river which drains it. This county had many pioneer forts and saw many bloody Indian battles. Here are the world-famed White Sulphur and other mineral springs.

Formed in 1799 from Greenbrier. Named for President James Monroe. In this county lived Col. Andrew S. Rowan who, 1898, carried the news of American intervention to General Y Iniguez Garcia, leader of the Cubans.

Location: WV 3

Title: Greenbrier County/Monroe County County: Greenbrier/Monroe

Inscription: Formed, 1778, from Botetourt and Montgomery. Named for the river which drains it. This county had many pioneer forts and saw many bloody Indian battles. Here are the world-famed White Sulphur and other mineral springs.

Location: US 219

Title: Monroe County/West Virginia (Monroe County) County: Monroe

Inscription: Formed in 1799 from Greenbrier. Named for President James Monroe. In this county lived Col. Andrew S. Rowan who, 1898, carried the news of American intervention to General Y Iniguez Garcia, leader of the Cubans.

"The Mountain State" -- western part of the Commonwealth of Virginia until June 20, 1863. Settled by the Germans and Scotch-Irish. It became a line of defense between the English and French during the French and Indian War, 1754-1763.

Location: Peterstown, US 219 (missing)

Title: Monroe County/West Virginia (Monroe County) County: Monroe

Inscription: Formed in 1799 from Greenbrier. Named for President James Monroe. In this county lived Col. Andrew S. Rowan who, 1898, carried the news of American intervention to General Y Iniguez Garcia, leader of the Cubans.

"The Mountain State" -- western part of the Commonwealth of Virginia until June 20, 1863. Settled by the Germans and Scotch-Irish. It became a line of defense between the English and French during the French and Indian War, 1754-1763.

Location: WV 311 (missing)

Title: Monroe County/Summers County County: Monroe/Summers

Inscription: Formed in 1799 from Greenbrier. Named for President James Monroe. In this county lived Col. Andrew S. Rowan who, 1898, carried the news of American intervention to General Y Iniguez Garcia, leader of the Cubans.

Formed, 1871, from Monroe, Fayette, Greenbrier, Mercer. Named for the distinguished jurist of Kanawha, George W. Summers. Dr. Thomas Walker and companions explored the Greenbrier Valley, 1750, for the Greenbrier Company.

Location: WV 12

Title: Big Lime County: Monroe

Inscription: The Greenbrier Limestone, which outcrops along U. S. Route 219 between here and Renick, is the "Big Lime" of the driller. Fish-egg like oolitic zones in the "Big Lime" yield oil and nautral gas in West Virginia.

Location: US 219, 1 miles south of Union

Title: Salt Sulphur County: Monroe

Inscription: Opened as a resort in 1820. Main building erected about 1836. Martin Van Buren, Clay, and Calhoun among prominent guests. General Jenkins and other Confederate leaders made headquarters here during several campaigns.

Location: US 219, 2 miles south of Union

Title: Grave of Elizabeth Graham Stodghill County: Monroe

Inscription: Atop the hill on the Coulter farm is the gravesite of Elizabeth Graham Stodghill (1770-1858), and her husband Joel. In 1777, at the age of 7, Elizabeth was captured by a band of Shawnees who raided her home at Lowell and took her to Ohio. She was found and ransomed by her father, James Graham Sr., in 1785. Gravesite located, 1973, by Carrie Reardon, nee Graham, great-great-great granddaughter of the Lowell homesteader.

Location: Just north of Lindside, US 219

Title: Woods' Fort County: Monroe

Inscription: This defense, erected, 1773, by Captain Michael Woods, was of importance during Lord Dunmore's War. Troops from here were engaged in the Battle of Point Pleasant next year and later were with George Rogers Clark.

Location: US 219, between Peterstown and Lindside

Title: Home of the Jones Diamond County: Monroe

Inscription: An alluvial diamond weighing 34.48 carats, largest to date found in North America, was discovered here in April 1928, by William P. "Punch" Jones and his father, Grover C. Jones, Sr., while pitching horseshoes in the home yard of Mr. and Mrs. Grover C. Jones. "Punch" was later killed in combat during World War II. Mr. and Mrs. Grover C. Jones still retain ownership of the diamond.

Location: Peterstown, US 219, Sycamore & Market streets

Title: Peterstown County: Monroe

Inscription: Founded by Christian Peters who settled two miles east in 1784. Established as a town in 1804. Peters served as expert rifleman in Revolutionary War. Giles, Fayette and Kanawha Turnpike, notable north-south route, linked town in 1830s.

Location: Peterstown, US 219 near WV 12

Title: Red Sulphur Springs County: Monroe

Inscription: Site of a popular resort hotel, built in 1832. Water from the springs was reputed to have curative value. Hotel was used as a military hospital during Civil War. Last owner was Levi P. Morton, vice-president under Benjamin Harrison.

Location: Red Sulphur Springs, WV 12

Title: Saltpeter Caves County: Monroe

Inscription: The large rooms of these caves have high vaults and are easily accessible from the outside and are dry under foot. They were owned by John Maddy in 1804. He sold them to Jacob and John Mann who manufactured saltpeter here for several years. The caves were used for the same purpose during Civil War. Old wooden hoppers still stand and mule tracks can yet be seen on the long walkways where the wagons used to run.

Location: Just east of Greenville, WV 122

Title: Cook's Fort County: Monroe

Inscription: Constructed, circa 1770, on land owned by Valentine Cook on Indian Creek. Cook's Fort was one of the largest frontier forts on the western line of settlement, and provided very strong defensive post. Fort covered over acre and had four blockhouses. It sheltered 300 people during Native American attacks of 1778 and was actively used through early 1780s. Several settlers, unable to reach fort, were killed here.

Location: Just west of Greenville, WV 122

Title: Reformatory for Women County: Monroe

Inscription: The only Federal industrial institution for women is one mile west. Established by an act of Congress, June 7, 1924. Received first tenants, April 30, 1927. Formally opened Nov. 24, 1928. Stresses rehabilitation and industrial education.

Location: Alderson, WV 3, south entrance of Greenbrier River bridge

Title: Joseph Swope County: Monroe

Inscription: Born 1707 in Germany, Swope came to America ca. 1720. Reputedly first to settle Monroe County, ca. 1752, when part of Augusta Co. Son Michael, born 29 Sept. 1753, recorded as 1st white child born in Monroe. Nearby is grave of son Joseph, seized in 1756 Shawnee raid and held captive for nine years. Swope served in Colonial Wars and his sons, Joseph, John and Michael served in the American Revolution.

Location: Near Wolf Creek, WV 3 near Laurel Creek Bridge

Title: First Corn Club County: Monroe

Inscription: West Virginia's first Corn Club was organized at Pickaway School on idea of county superintendent C. A. Keadle, with support from WVU Agricultural Dean T. C. Atkenson. WVU Extension Dept. provided 71 schoolchildren with tested seed in 1908 and 46 entered crop in corn show at courthouse in Union in November. Corn Clubs, later known as Agricultural Clubs, paved the way for today's 4-H Clubs.

Location: Pickaway, US 219 near WV 3

Title: Rowan Memorial Home County: Monroe

Inscription: Established as a home for the aged by act of the Legislature in 1945. Named for Andrew Summers Rowan, carrier of the "message to Garcia". The oldest building, erected in 1833, is of Thomas Jefferson design and named in his honor.

Location: Sweet Springs, WV 3

Title: Ann Royall/Sweet Springs County: Monroe

Inscription: Ann Royall, America's first woman journalist, lived here. Widowed at 50, she became an author and prominent figure in national political life. In her newspaper, "Paul Pry," at Washington, she set the style for modern columnists.

Settled by James Moss, 1760. William Lewis bought the site and in 1792 built the inn where he entertained Van Buren, Pierce, Fillmore, and others. Thomas Jefferson designed the main building which was erected in 1833.

Location: Sweet Springs, WV 3

Title: Gov. John Floyd County: Monroe

Inscription: Near here is grave of John Floyd, 1783-1837. Governor of Virginia, 1830-1834; champion of the Oregon Country and of States' Rights; leader in the formation of the Whig Party; bitter foe of administration of President Andrew Jackson.

Location: WV 3 and WV 311, near Sweet Springs

Title: Great Eastern Divide County: Monroe

Inscription: At this point atop the Alleghenies is the geographical feature known as the Great Eastern Divide, a natural barrier from which water flows to the Atlantic Ocean by way of the Jackson and James rivers and to the Gulf of Mexico via the Greenbrier, New, Kanawha, Ohio and Miss. rivers. As part of the Proclamation Line of 1763, it temporarily served to stop further western colonial expansion.

Location: WV 3, 5.1 miles west of Sweet Springs

Title: Andrew S. Rowan County: Monroe

Inscription: Colonel Rowan was born here, April 23, 1857; graduated from West Point, 1881. Famed for securing vital information from Garcia, rebel leader of Cuba, during War with Spain, 1898. For this exploit, he was given the D.S.C. Died, Jan. 11, 1943.

Location: Gap Mills, WV 3

Title: Rehoboth Church County: Monroe

Inscription: Indians were still about when Rehoboth Church was dedicated by Bishop Asbury in 1786, and rifles as well as Bibles were carried by the worshipers. This is the oldest church building west of the Allegheny Mountains.

Location: WV 3, 2 miles east of Union

Title: Bishop Matthew W. Clair, Sr. County: Monroe

Inscription: Born at Union, 1865. Converted at 15 at Simpson M. E. Church, Charleston. Licensed to preach; his first parish was Harpers Ferry, 1889. His most distinguished pastoral work was the rebuilding of Asbury Church, Washington, with a seating capacity of 1800. He was one of the two first Negroes in Methodism to achieve the office of bishop. He died in Covington, Ky., in 1943, and was buried in Washington, D. C.

Location: Union, WV 3 near US 219 in front of Ames Methodist Church

Title: General John Echols County: Monroe

Inscription: Gen. Echols was born March 20, 1823 in Lynchburg, Virginia. He entered the Confederate Army from his home in Union. With rank of Lieut. Col., Echols commanded the 27th Virginia Brigade, Staunton Infantry, at Manassas and was severely wounded at Kernstown. He was commissioned Brig. Gen. on April 16, 1862. His later service was mostly in West Virginia. He died May 24, 1896 and was buried in Staunton.

Location: Union, US 219 and WV 3, courthouse square

Title: Union County: Monroe

Inscription: Settled in 1774 by James Alexander, who later served in Revolutionary Army. County organized at his house, 1799. "Walnut Grove," built by Andrew Beirne, and "Elmwood," built by the Capertons, fine examples of colonial architecture.

Location: Union, US 219, courthouse square

Title: Civil War Monument County: Monroe

Inscription: On Aug. 21, 1901 this 20 ft. monument with 6 ft. statue depicting typical Confederate soldier was dedicated to the Monroe County men who served the lost cause. Hinton Marble Works produced the Italian marble statue, standing on granite pedestal placed on native blue limestone. Site selected in anticipation of Union's growth. Dedication crowd of 10,000 heard speech of Gen. John Echols.

Location: Union, US 219 near Union Presbyterian Church

Title: Blockhouse on Indian Creek/Home of Isaac Estill County: Monroe

Inscription: Built by Wallace Estill, who relocated here in fall, 1773 from Fort George on Bullpasture R. He was comm. Capt. in 1752, served in Colonial Wars against Native Americans; and as High Sheriff & Magistrate, Augusta Co. 3-story stone home with 18 in. walls, served as block house for protection against raids. Capt. Estill died, 1792, age 94. Son, Isaac, inherited and likely added frame addition. Placed on National Register in 1984.

Isaac moved to block house on Indian Creek in 1773 at age 7 with Wallace & Mary Ann Campbell Estill. In 1788 he married Elizabeth, dau. of John Frogg, killed in 1774 at Battle of Pt. Pleasant, & granddau. of John Lewis, 1st settler of Augusta Co. Isaac served in 1799 as 1st and later 6th sheriff of Monroe Co.; in Va General Assembly, 1806-09 and 1817-18; and as a Major in the Virginia Militia. Relocated to Kentucky in 1818.

Location: County Route 122, approximately one mile west of junction with US 219, nine miles south of Union

Title: Gap Mills/William Humphreys County: Monroe

Inscription: Formerly Moss Hole, re-named for cut in Gap Mnt. & area grist mills in 1849. Wood's party in 1671 were first whites to view. Four Maxwell sisters' families settled in 1790; led 1835 formation of Carmel Presby. Church. Gen. Hunter retreated via Gap, 1864. Birthplace of Spanish-American War hero Andrew S. Rowan, physicist W.J. Humphreys; first WV Ruritan Club, 1949; and State Park designation, Moncove Lake, 1990

Nearby noted meteorological physicist born 2/3/1862; died 11/10/1949. Johns Hopkins U. Ph.D., 1897; Dir., Mt. Weather Observatory, 1905; famous for 1909 research on stratosphere; retired, Weather Service, 1935. Winds of Peters Mountain auth.

Location: WV3, Gap Mills

Title: Mann-Miller/Springfield County: Monroe

Inscription: The Mann and Miller families, neighbors in Germany, together migrated to America and settled near this site circa 1774. First were friends John Miller and Jacob Mann. Families labored to build Cook's Fort, Indian Creek Church and town of Springfield. Both settlers and most family burials in Tyler Mann and Miller-Halstead cemeteries.

Here in 1852, 1/4 acre lots were sold to form the community of Springfield, located on Great Road. Some forty families lived in the village, which included homes, stores, schools, churches, mill, tannery, brick yard, post office and a resort hotel. Known as Hunters Springs, the town had virtually disappeared by the middle of the twentieth century.

Location: WV 122, near Greenville

Title: William Porcher Miles County: Monroe

Inscription: In Green Hill Cemetery is the grave of William Porcher Miles, who was a Congressman from SC, a signer of the SC Ordinance of Secession and a member of the Confederate Congress. During the Civil War he served on the staff of General PGT Beauregard where he helped to negotiate surrender of Fort Sumter and was designer of the Confederate Battle Flag.

Location: Union, US 219, courthouse square

Title: Dr. Henry Lake Dickason County: Monroe

Inscription: H.L. Dickason, a noted educator from Lindside and the grandson of slaves, graduated from Bluefield Colored Institute in 1910 and The Ohio State University in 1913. He returned to BCI to teach math and as president from 1936 to 1952 led Bluefield State (Teachers) College to full accreditation. Dickason headed Morristown College (TN) from 1953 until his death in 1957.

Location: Intersection of 219 and 219/19 in Lindside

Title: Allen T. Caperton County: Monroe

Inscription: Born November 21, 1810, in Monroe County, he served in both houses of the Virginia legislature before the Civil War. Although he opposed secession, he voted for it in 1861 at the Richmond Convention. From 1863 to 1865, Caperton served in the Confederate Senate. In 1875, he succeeded Arthur I. Boreman as one of West Virginia’s U.S. senators, dying in office on July 26, 1876.

Location: US 219, Union

Title: Confederate Postal Service County: Monroe

Inscription: Rebel postal services were formed in early 1861 under John H. Reagan, with operations commencing June 1. In contested sections of wesetern Virginia, control of the mail often changed hands as battle lines ebbed and flowed. Southern strongholds in areas like Monroe County, where Maj. James Shanklin was postmaster, enjoyed more steady mail delivery during the entirety of the war.

Location: US 219, north of Union

Title: Rehoboth Church County: Monroe

Inscription: Oldest extant Protestant church west of the Alleghenies. Erected 1786 on land donated by Edward Keenan. Bishop Francis Asbury preached here in July 1788, held three Methodist conferences in 1790s, and performed the first Methodist ordination west of the Alleghenies. Named a Methodist shrine in 1960 and listed on the National Register in 1974.

Location: WV 3, two miles east of Union
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