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West Virginia
Medal of Honor
Recipients

CIVIL WAR (12 April 1861 - 26 May 1865)

Cabell Co. native Pvt. James F. Adams (1st West Virginia Cavalry) captured the State flag of the 14th Virginia Cavalry (CSA) at Ninevah, Virginia, on 12 November 1864.

Cpl. Thomas Anderson (1st West Virginia Cavalry) captured a Confederate flag at Appomattox Station, Virginia, on 8 April 1865.

Cpl. Andrew O. Apple (12th West Virginia Infantry) served with "conspicuous gallantry" as a color bearer during the assault on Fort Gregg at Petersburg, Virginia, on 2 April 1865.

Entering the service in Jackson Co., Pvt. William H. Barringer (4th West Virginia Infantry) stormed a Confederate stronghold at Vicksburg, Mississippi, on 22 May 1863.

Lt. Wilmon W. Blackmar (1st West Virginia Cavalry) led a successful advance on Confederate troops at Five Forks, Virginia, on 1 April 1865.

Capt. Hugh P. Boon (1st West Virginia Cavalry) captured a Confederate flag at Sailors Creek, Virginia, on 6 April 1865.

Entering the service at Wirt Courthouse, Sgt. Richard Boury (1st West Virginia Cavalry) captured a Confederate flag at Chancellorsville, Virginia, on 5 March 1865.

Fayette Co. native Sgt. John C. Buckley (4th West Virginia Infantry) for storming a Confederate stronghold at Vicksburg, Mississippi, on 22 May 1863.

Entering the service at Mason City, Sgt. William Bumgarner (4th West Virginia Infantry) led volunteer storming party at Petersburg, Virginia, on 2 April 1862.

Sgt. James M. Burns (1st West Virginia Cavalry) led troops to safety and carried a wounded man from the battlefield under heavy fire at New Market, Virginia, on 15 May 1864.

Maj. Charles E. Capehart (1st West Virginia Cavalry) led a midnight attack on a retreating Confederate wagon train at Monterey Mountain, Pennsylvania, on 4 July 1863.

Col. Henry Capehart (1st West Virginia Cavalry), under Confederate gunfire, saved the life of a drowning soldier in the Greenbrier River, Greenbrier County, 22 May 1864.

Sgt. Francis M. Cunningham (1st West Virginia Cavalry) captured the battle flag of the 12th Virginia Infantry (CSA) at Sailors Creek, Virginia, on 6 April 1865.

Ohio Co. native 2nd Lt. Josiah M. Curtis (12th West Virginia Infantry) retrieved his unit's flag from two fallen color bearers and was one of the first Union soldiers to reach Fort Gregg during an assault on Petersburg, Virginia, on 2 April 1865.

Entering the service at Clarksburg, 2nd Lt. James R. Durham (12th West Virginia Infantry) led his command over a stone wall during the Battle of Winchester, Virginia, on 14 June 1863.

Lewis Co. native John N. Eckes (47th Ohio Infantry) for storming a Confederate stronghold at Vicksburg, Mississippi, on 22 May 1863.

Mason Co. native 1st Sgt. Leonidas M. Godley (22nd Iowa Infantry) severely wounded while leading troops to the parapet of Confederate works at Vicksburg, Mississippi, on 22 May 1863.

Commissary Sgt. William Houlton (1st West Virginia Cavalry) captured a Confederate flag at Sailors Creek, Virginia, on 6 April 1865.

Pvt. Joseph Kimball (2nd West Virginia Cavalry) captured the battle flag of the 6th North Carolina Infantry (CSA) at Sailors Creek, Virginia, on 6 April 1865.

Ohio Co. native Pvt. Joseph McCauslin (12th West Virginia Infantry) served with "conspicuous gallantry" as a color bearer during the assault on Fort Gregg at Petersburg, Virginia, on 2 April 1865.

Entering the service at Pt. Pleasant, Pvt. Samuel O. McElhinny (2nd West Virginia Cavalry) captured a Confederate flag at Sailors Creek, Virginia, on 6 April 1865.

Lewis Co. native Commissary Sgt. Walter F. McWhorter (3rd West Virginia Cavalry) captured the battle flag of the 6th Tennessee Infantry (CSA) at Sailors Creek, Virginia, on 6 April 1865.

Tyler Co. native Pvt. George G. Moore (11th West Virginia Infantry) captured a Confederate flag at the Battle of Fishers Hill, Virginia, on 22 September 1864.

Pvt. Jasper N. North (4th West Virginia Infantry) stormed a Confederate stronghold at Vicksburg, Mississippi, on 22 May 1863.

Entering the service at Mason City, Pvt. Joel Parsons (4th West Virginia Infantry) stormed a Confederate stronghold at Vicksburg, Mississippi, on 22 May 1863.

Maj. William H. Powell (2nd West Virginia Cavalry) led 20 troops in capturing a Confederate camp of 500 at Sinking Creek Valley, Virginia, on 26 November 1862.

Harrison Co. native Pvt. Charles Reeder (12th West Virginia Infantry) captured a Confederate flag during an assault on Fort Gregg at Petersburg, Virginia, on 2 April 1865.

Pvt. Archibald H. Rowand, Jr., (1st West Virginia Cavalry) was one of two men to get through Confederate lines with dispatches for General Ulysses Grant in the winter of 1864-65.

Entering the service at Mason City, Chief Bugler Charles Schorn (1st West Virginia Cavalry) captured the battle flag of the Sumter Flying Artillery (CSA) at Appomattox Station, Virginia, on 8 April 1865.

Preston Co. native Cpl. Emisire Shahan (1st West Virginia Cavalry) captured the battle flag of the 76th Georgia Infantry (CSA) at Sailors Creek, Virginia, on 6 April 1865.

Monongalia Co. native Pvt. John Shanes (14th West Virginia Infantry) singlehandedly took out a Confederate fieldpiece at the Battle of Carters Farm, Virginia, on 20 July 1864.

Pvt. Bernard Shields (2nd West Virginia Cavalry) captured the battle flag of the Washington Artillery (CSA) at Appomattox Station, Virginia, on 8 April 1865.

Monongalia Co. native Pvt. Levi Shoemaker (1st West Virginia Cavalry) captured the battle flag of the 22nd Virginia Cavalry (CSA) at Nineveh, Virginia, on 12 November 1864.

Kanawha Co. native Pvt. James C. Summers (4th West Virginia Infantry) stormed a Confederate stronghold at Vicksburg, Mississippi, on 22 May 1863.

Mason Co. native Pvt. Joseph Van Matre (116th Ohio Infantry) led an attack on Fort Gregg at Petersburg, Virginia, on 2 April 1865.

Romney native Pvt. Thomas J. Ward (116th Illinois Infantry) stormed a Confederate stronghold at Vicksburg, Mississippi, on 22 May 1863.

Entering the service at Parkersburg, Cpl. Adam White (11th West Virginia Infantry) captured a Confederate flag at Hatchers Run, Virginia, on 2 April 1865.

Ohio Co. native Pvt. Daniel A. Woods (1st West Virginia Cavalry) captured the battle flag of the 18th Florida Infantry (CSA) at Sailors Creek, Virginia, on 6 April 1865.


SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR (21 April 1898 - 4 July 1902)

Charleston native Marine Sgt. John Henry Quick signaled the U.S.S. Dolphin on three occasions while under heavy gunfire during the Battle of Cuzco, Cuba, on 14 June 1898.


PHILIPPINE INSURRECTION

Entering the service at Williamson, Cpl. Antoine A. Gaujot (27th U.S. Infantry) swam to obtain a canoe under heavy fire at San Mateo in the Philippines, on 19 December 1899. He is the brother of Medal of Honor recipient Julien E. Gaujot.


WORLD WAR II (7 December 1941 - 31 December 1946, extended to 25 July 1947 in some cases)

Grantsville native Technical Sgt. Bernard P. Bell (U.S. Army 142nd Infantry, 36th Infantry Division) singlehandedly captured a a schoolhouse filled with 26 German troops at Mittelwihr, France, on 18 December 1944. Over the next several days, his 8-man squad held the schoolhouse, repelling numerous German attacks, driving back approximately 150, killing at least 87, and capturing 42. He personally killed more than 20 and captured 33 prisoners.

Sgt. Stanley Bender of Carlisle (U.S. Army 7th Infantry, 3rd Infantry Division) singlehandedly overtook a German machine gun battery near La Lande, France, on 17 August 1944. A bridge on I- 64 in Raleigh County is named in his honor.

Huntington native Lt. Col. Justice M. Chambers (Marine Corps Reserve, 3rd Assault Battalion Landing Team, 25th Marines, 4th Marine Division) led the initial assault on Iwo Jima in the Volcano Islands from 19 to 22 February 1945.

Huntington native 2nd Lt. Robert E. Femoyer (711th heavy Bombing Squadron) was severely wounded over Merseburg, Germany, on 2 November 1944, but flew his crew for over two hours to Great Britain. He died shortly after being removed from the plane.

Technical Sgt. Clinton M. Hedrick of Cherry Grove (Pendleton County) (194th Glider Infantry, 17th Airborne Division) was killed at Lembeck, Germany, on 28 March 1945. He had singlehandedly pursued German troops into Lembeck Castle before being shot. Over the previous two days, he had charged three times into heavy gunfire.

S/Sgt. Jonah E. Kelley of Rhoda (311th Infantry, 78th Infantry Division) was shot and killed in battle at Kesternich, Germany, on 31 January 1945. Over the previous two days, he had been wounded seriously twice while leading his troops into battle.

Salem native Cpl. Melvin Mayfield (20th Infantry, 6th Infantry Division) singlehandedly destroyed an enemy machine gun battery in the Cordillera Mountains in the Philippines on 29 July 1945, despite a serious hand wound.

S/Sgt. Junior J. Spurrier of Bluefield (134th infantry, 35th Division) singlehandedly killed 25 German troops and captured another 22 at Achain, France, on 13 November 1944.

Sgt. Herbert J. Thomas of South Charleston (3rd Marine Division) was killed when he fell on a grenade at the Battle of the Koromokina River, Bougainville Islands in the Solomon Islands, on 7 November 1943, to save the lives of other soldiers.

Huntington native PFC Walter C. Wetzel (13th Infantry, 8th Infantry Division) was killed when he fell on two grenades at Birken, Germany, on 3 April 1945, to save the lives of other soldiers.

Cpl. Hershel Woodrow "Woody" Williams of Quiet Dell (3rd Marine Corps) continually attacked Japanese machine gun batteries on Iwo Jima in the Volcano Islands with a flamethrower on 23 February 1945. A bridge in Barboursville is named in his honor.


KOREAN CONFLICT (27 June 1950 - 31 January 1955)

East Gulf (Raleigh Co.) native Sgt. Cornelius H. Charlton (24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Army Infantry Division) was killed while leading his troops up Hill 543 near Chipo-ri on 1 June 1952. A bridge on I-77 in Mercer County is named in his honor.

Entering the service at Racine, 2nd Lt. Darwin K. Kyle (7th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division), was killed while leading a bayonet charge near Kamil-ni, on 16 February 1951.

PFC Ralph E. Pomeroy of Quinwood (31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division) was killed while defending a communication trench near Kumhwa, on 15 October 1952.

S/Sgt. William E. Shuck, Jr. (7th Marines, 1st Marine Division) was killed while leading a machine gun squad under heavy fire.


VIETNAM ERA (5 August 1964 - 7 May 1975)

Accoville native Sgt. Ted Belcher (1st Battalion, 14th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division) was killed when he fell on a grenade at Plei Djerang on 19 November 1966, to save the lives of his troops.

Morgantown native Cpl. Thomas W. Bennett (medic, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry) was killed in the Chu Pa Region of Pleiku Province on 11 February 1969, while trying to save the life of a soldier. For three days, he had been providing medical aid to wounded soldiers under heavy gunfire.

Entering the service at Fairmont, S/Sgt. Robert W. Hartsock (44th Infantry Platoon, 3rd Brigade, 25th Infantry Division), was killed when he fell on a satchel charge in Hau Nghia Province on 23 February 1969, to save the lives of other soldiers.

Montgomery native Sp4c. Carmel B. Harvey (1st Cavalry Division Airmobile) was killed when enemy fire exploded a grenade attached to his belt while charging an enemy position in Binh Dinh Province on 21 June 1967.

Avondale (McDowell Co.) native PFC Phill G. McDonald (1st Battalion, 14th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division) was killed while providing cover fire near Kontum City on 7 June 1968.

Pvt. Gary W. Martini of Charleston (2nd Battalion, 1st Marines, 1st Marine Division) saved the life of a wounded soldier after being fatally wounded himself at Binh Son on 21 April 1967.

Logan native S/Sgt. Frankie Zoly Molnar (8th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division) was killed when he fell on a grenade in Kontum Province on 20 May 1967, to save the lives of other soldiers.

Claremont (Fayette Co.) native Lt. Col. Charles C. Rogers (1st Battalion, 5th Artillery, 1st Infantry Division) was seriously wounded but continued to lead an artillery attack at Fishhook near the Cambodian border on 1 November 1968.

West Columbia native S/Sgt. Jimmy G. Stewart (12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division Airmobile) was killed while singlehandedly defending a position on 18 May 1966.


OTHER ACTIONS

U.S. Navy Chief Gunner Robert Edward Cox of St. Albans helped bring a major fire under control on the U.S.S. Missouri, on 13 April 1904.

Marshall Co. native Sgt. Benjamin C. Criswell (7th U.S. Cavalry) led troops against Sioux Indians and rescued the body of a lieutenant at the Battle of Little Big Horn, Montana, on 25 June 1876.

Martinsburg native U.S. Navy Ensign Hugh Carroll Frazer saved the life of a wounded soldier during the Battle of Vera Cruz, Mexico, on 22 April 1914.

Entering the service at Williamson, Capt. Julien E. Gaujot (1st U.S. Cavalry) crossed a field under gunfire to receive the surrender of Mexican Federals at Aqua Prieta, Mexico, on 13 April 1911. He is the brother of Medal of Honor recipient Antoine A. Gaujot.

Fire Creek (Fayette County) native U.S. Navy Commander Claud Ashton Jones remained at the helm of the U.S.S. Memphis despite scalding steam from exploding boilers during a hurricane off Santo Domingo City on 29 August 1916.

Edgewood (Harrison County) native U.S. Navy Boatswain's Mate Second Class Henry Nehemiah Nickerson demonstrated "extraordinary heroism" aboard the U.S.S. Utah during the Battle of Vera Cruz, Mexico, on 21 April 1914.

Burnt House (Ritchie County) native U.S. Navy Seaman Lawrence C. Sinnett demonstrated "extraordinary heroism" aboard the U.S.S. Florida during the battle of Vera Cruz, Mexico, on 21 April 1914.


"West Virginians Awarded the Medal of Honor," by Boyd B. Stutler

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